The Story Behind The Stats: A First Hand Account Of H1N1 On Campus

Today’s Youth Advisory Board post comes from Bryan Spencer, one of our newest board members (look for more YAB updates next week!), Ypulse Insights intern and among the many unfortunate college students to fall victim to the H1N1 virus. With all of the recent Essentials items on youth-targeted flu campaigns and general news coverage on the epidemic, we thought we’d ask Bryan to share his first hand experience.

FYI Ypulse Insights also did some research on H1N1 awareness (in addition to youth television viewing & much more), which will be available in our NEW Ypulse Report (on sale next week) as well as in our abbreviated Ypulse Monitor product (also on sale next week), and found that awareness is running high. Eighty-four percent of teens and 93% of collegians told us they were aware of the H1N1 Virus or “swine flu” – having either read or heard something about it. For more of Ypulse Insights research on teens and collegians, check out the new Ypulse Research section of our site.

As always, you can communicate directly with any member of the Ypulse Youth Advisory Board by emailing them at youthadvisoryboard at ypulse.com…or just leave a comment below.

Story Behind The Stats: A First Hand Account Of H1N1 On Campus

kansascampus.h1n1.H1N1, Swine Flu,  whatever you want to call it, the virus is sweeping colleges nationwide, and some are starting to consider it a worse epidemic than Senioritis.  On campus, where very little is read outside of a text message, most awareness has spread through rumors and misconceptions about the highly contagious strand of influenza running rampant online and through classrooms and dormitories.

Like most rumors, they weren’t taken seriously until some truth came from them.  I personally didn’t know much about H1N1, and didn’t realize how serious it was in Lawrence,…

 
 

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