The Safety Zone Generation

Playing It Safe: Gen Ys and the Caution Effect

The statement that Gen Ys grew up coddled and protected has been used so much by generational experts that it almost feels cliché saying it. But the less-discussed flip side to this over-protection incubation is that Millennials were raised in an environment of high anxiety that taught them from a very early age that there is always something around the corner that could hurt you or go wrong. After all, there was a reason that you couldn’t walk down the street to school by yourself; stranger danger was everywhere. They could very well be called Generation Amber Alert. Add to this early-age hyper-awareness of personal danger the fact that the media they have been surrounded by has essentially been a non-stop loop of terror and highly dramatized fear-mongering-for-ratings and it is understandable that Millennials tend to be an anxious bunch.

Then, when this group of high-risk guarded youth were just starting out on their own, the recession hit and they watched friends and family who had bet big on houses, stocks, and high-stakes careers lose everything. Put all together, you have the perfect equation for a generation with a healthy fear of risk taking. Today, this risk-averse mentality affects how they are living their lives in a major way, from delaying major life decisions to approaching their futures with extreme caution.

Never a generation of rebels (why break the rules when you’re friends with your parents and could break any law you wanted in video games), Millennials today are moving forward in their lives with extreme caution. This general fear of taking big leaps could help explain the fairly drastically delayed ages at which Millennials are choosing to get married and have children when compared to other generations. In some…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I like yoga because It can be used for the body, mind, breath, and soul if desired. I can do it alone or with other people. It can also be as short or long as I want.”—Female, 27, AR

Google has opened a new space in the U.K. to help YouTubers “learn, connect, and create.” YouTube Space London, the second largest Google facility for YouTubers, includes soundproof studios, editing suites, and a store for creators to sell their merchandise. It is also one of the few locations to have live streaming capabilities in 4k. The space will also feature workshops to build up creators’ audiences and ultimately “help people to develop and grow their careers.”  Although visitors are welcome to the location, production studio access is limited to YouTubers with over 10,000 subscribers. (Business Insider

Women’s clothing brand Milly has hit refresh on their visual identity and they’re making Instagram a central part of their brand narrative. Instead of taking the traditional route and redesigning their logo to evolve the brand, Milly created “an arsenal of 400 images” for Instagram that are meant to pop on viewers’ feeds and shows their “evolving personality.” Instagram has proven to “powerful tool for an industry that sells aspiration and desire as well as it does skirts and blouses,” and serves as a way for consumers to discover brands and experience their overall look and feel. (Fast Company

A new social sports platform is aiming to be the only app fans will ever need. GameOn allows fans to looks up sports scores, news, and updates while engaging in chats with friends, athletes, and content creators. While its biggest hurdle will be convincing fans to download yet another sports app, the startup has many well-known celebrities and athletes on board for the assist. Investor and former NFL player Milloy, says of the platform: “I was sick of needing five apps to keep up with all of my teams, and I have too much on my phone as it is…The game watching experience on GameOn is so great, it’s hard to go back to just watching an entire game on TV.” (GeekWire

For the younger generation, going to college is an Instagram opportunity. A pair of freshman roommates at Ole Miss have gone viral for redesigning their small standard college dorm room to resemble a luxurious palace. Spending on dorm room décor has reportedly increased over the last few years, and extreme dorm makeovers are increasingly common, as evidenced by the 68,296 #dormroom photos on Instagram. The trend is part of a larger pattern of teens seeking more premium experiences from higher education institutions. A Bloomberg analysis of 94 student housing complexes in the U.S. found 80% have swimming pool access, 55% have on-site tanning salons, and 45% have beach volleyball courts. (The Guardian)

Millennial moms may be “the greatest lifetime monetary value of any consumer segment in the history of marketing,” so how can they be reached? After following a group of Millennial moms, Connelly Partners’ say empathy is key for brands looking to connect. The advertising agency found that the pressure is on for the moms of today, as they juggle being experts in cyber-security, nutrition, education, and physical fitness, all while portraying a “put together” image. Brands need to acknowledge their anxieties and challenges while offering them resources and reminding them to embrace the hard work they’ve done so far. (Advertising Age

Quote of the Day: “Facebook is my favorite app, because it’s my source of news and how I keep up with friends/family.”—Female, 19, OR

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