The Rise of Snap-Judgment Dating

If you haven’t heard of Tinder yet, you probably haven’t been hanging out with any single Millennials lately. The dating app has become big buzz in recent months, finding popularity on college campuses and in urban dating scenes alike. The basic premise of Tinder is to connect you with new people in your area (within a 50 mile radius) that you already have common interests with. Using Facebook information, the service presents potential matches to the user based on a rating composed from a combination of shared friends, interests, and networks. Once two users have expressed mutual interest in one another and a match has been made, they can chat through the app and then meet up in real life.
 
On one level, Tinder is a perfect example of the technology that facilitates Millennials’ real-life interactions. It connects people with common interests, and allows them to test the waters of communication by chatting casually through the app before deciding to actually meet. A useful service with a positive purpose: helping young digitally savvy people meet and find love, and one that some may say is especially needed in the modern dating world where old structures of courtship have broken down.
 
But on another level, Tinder puts the superficial snap-judgment front and center in the pre-dating process. The most addictive (and talked about) feature of the app is the ability to filter through potential dates with the swipe of a finger. Images (and the name and age) of possible matches are shown in a seemingly endless stream and then pushed into “like” or “pass” categories— mostly based just on their profile picture, and often in a mere few seconds. Think Hot or Not for dating. To use another comparison, it is essentially the digital version of the now-defunct MTV dating show Next, in which…

 
 

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The Newsfeed

Quote of the Day: “I like following Jeffree Star on social media because he creates high-quality makeup while also being entertaining.”

—Female, 21, FL

Millennials are more likely to talk politics at work than their parents. A new study from Peakon has revealed that despite the highly-tense political climate, most Americans are actually comfortable discussing politics at work. Millennials are the most comfortable, with 68% stating they feel “no discomfort” talking about the topic, compared to 62% of 55-64-year-olds. According to Peakon, the internet has encouraged Millennials to “shar[e] their opinions everywhere—on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, blogs, etc.,” and their desire for a “more transparent” workplace is also likely driving the trend. (Elite Daily

Honest Company is taking their diapers to the Major Leagues. In a partnership with MLB, the company is launching a “Born a Fan” collection in Target that will offer personal care products, household cleaners, and diapers with logos from six teams: the Red Sox, Yankees, Cubs, Giants, Cardinals, and Dodgers. The brand hopes to tap into “hardcore” baseball fans with the venture, but according to one expert, it may end up being more of a novelty: “It[’ll be] fun to do once in a while. But ultimately parents know diaper performance, and they buy the best.” (Adweek

Aspiring musicians have found a home—and a lot of money—on emerging live streaming spaces. Not only do live stream apps, like YouNow and Live.ly, give up-and-coming music acts the chance to build up large fan bases, but the addition of virtual tip jars has become a lucrative channel of revenue for some, even eliminating the need to do IRL performances or sell recordings. Brent Morgan, a 29-year-old musician, is finding his way into the industry by broadcasting twice a day on YouNow, where he’s making between $15,000-$20,000 a month. (The Wall Street Journal

Asian-Pacific kids would choose internet over TV if they had to pick. TotallyAwesome’s APAC Kids Market Insights report found that 77% of six-14-year-olds in the Asia-Pacific region would prefer to use the internet exclusively versus just TV—an 11% increase from the year before. In five out of the seven countries surveyed, children are more likely to have access to smartphones than TV, but both TV and smartphones are the most popular devices used daily, with 60% using them multiple times a day, versus 44% who use tablets daily. (Kidscreen

Virtual reality is getting a “first-of-its-kind” animated family series. Raising a Rukus, created by Virtual Reality Company, follows the story “of two siblings and their mischievous pet dog Ruckus, who are traveling to different worlds and have magical adventures together.” VRC describes the experience as “watching a Pixar short—except that you are immersed in it.” The series will be available through headsets and in theaters, first in Canada and then North America later this summer. (Variety

Quote of the Day: “My favorite brand to follow on social media is Urban Outfitters because not only do they post about items I am interested in, but I also get inspired by the artistic photos that they post.”—Female, 16, CA

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