The Rise of Friendsgiving: How Millennials Have Invented Their Own Holiday

It has all the trimmings of a Thanksgiving feast, but none of the family drama. Welcome to the age of Friendsgiving. Millennials in the U.S. are embracing a new version of the fall tradition, gathering with friends for their own turkey feasts and creating their own holiday in the process. 30% of Millennials 13-24-years-old on Thumb told us that they celebrate Friendsgiving. The phrase has even made it to Urban Dictionary. The new holiday has taken over college campuses and urban friend groups alike, and is starting to become an important ritual for many Millennials.

The rules around Friendsgiving are not hard and fast. For some, the holiday replaces Thanksgiving, especially if they are stuck at home, in dorms, or abroad, and aren’t able to make it to their family festivities. Friendsgiving celebrations have been thriving on college campuses, where students might not have the time or money to travel. But for others, Friendsgiving is being added to their schedules in November in the weeks before or the days after their regular Thanksgivings. So if they are already getting their regularly scheduled serving of turkey and pie, why is Friendsgiving becoming a thing

It might sound like a cliché explanation, but Millennials’ group mentality probably has a lot to do with the new holiday. For them, friends aren’t just friends, but another form of family. As one student newspaper put it, “Not only does Friendsgiving give students the opportunity to be thankful for their second family at school, but it also removes the inevitable awkward moments that come with any family holiday…Have a Friendsgiving. Celebrate both of your families.” Friendsgiving solidifies a friend group or a clique and makes the people in that group feel special, and more like family. On top of that, the holiday is…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

According to Pew, a third of Millennials frequently use their phones in public for “no particular reason,” and 13% say they frequently use their mobile devices to avoid interacting with other people. (Queue the “anti-social Millennial” pieces.) But another study might shed some more light on their “for no reason” phone use: 60% believe their smartphones enhances their leisure time. The research hypothesizes that young consumers are using phones for moments of “micro-leisure” throughout the day. (Washington PostSocialTimes)

Malia Obama has grown into a bit of a style icon. Though the fashion world has been watching her mother since their first day in the White House, now that Malia is a little older, and interning for HBO’s Girls in NYC, her looks are beginning to influence her young fans. One designer, whose look nearly sold out after Malia was photographed in, it tells the New YorkTimes that she is “a blossoming influencer.” (JezebelNYTimes)

Millennials are all hopped up on fancy coffee. The CEO of coffee chain Peet’s says that young consumers are “driving a shift in coffee consumption away from traditional economy brands and towards pricier, higher-quality beans." Millennials reportedly are looking for the best cup of joe, instead of the cheapest, and higher price coffee chains are benefitting from their high-end java tastes. (Eater)

You would think that with all the horror stories of cyber-bullying that have become national news stories in the past few years, parents would live in fear of their own kids being victims of bullying—but there is something else that they fear even more. Homework. A new study by notorious social platform Ask.fm found that 52% of parents say they are worried social media use will be a distraction from homework, compared to 21% who worry they may be bullied. (Business Insider)

Google has launched YouTube Gaming, a new platform that aggregates over 25,000 gaming channels into one place so that gamers can find the content they want more easily. Gamers are some of the most popular YouTube creators, and YouTube Gaming “is already a hit with advertisers”—and not just gaming brands. Kotex, Wendy’s, and NBCU have all purchased ads on the site, another sign of the mainstream embracing the gaming world. (Adweek)

Quote of the Day: “Forever 21 is my favorite store to shop in, the clothes are affordable and I can find every type that I might be looking for.” –Female, 27, NY

Netflix is entering the teenage world. Their latest programming plans include shows and movies for teens and tweens, including YouTube celeb vehicle Smosh: The Movie, in an effort to attract more young viewers, “known for their elusive and fickle tastes.” Netflix’s new focus on teens is a part of their goal to be a place for every kind of audience, and could help them gain more subscribers overall, as teens tend to influence their parents’ entertainment decisions. (NYTimesFortune)

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