Unlocking The Power Of “Belieber” Marketing

Bieber in WingsWhether you’re a Belieber or not, there’s no denying that Justin Bieber has long been a teen phenomenon and is a model in the marketing world as well. He’s built an army of loyal fans from social media, paved the way for other artists to do the same, and remains a powerhouse performer and teen idol. We attended his concert at Madison Square Garden last night, where it became eminently clear why he’s still a favorite among tweens, teens, and twentysomethings; he continuously celebrates fans for being a part of his journey and for believing in him. This authentic attitude and his enormous appreciation for his fans is something that marketers across all industries can learn from and adopt.

Fans have always been a huge part of Bieber’s success from making his YouTube videos go viral to showing up at events to support him. Throughout the concert last night, he kept thanking his fans for all that they’ve done and even took time to express this in video form. Various clips of him circa his childhood YouTube days were shown on screen and Bieber noted how his fans helped discover and launch him to stardom. As a result, fans feel a strong attachment to him since they knew of him before he was famous, and in essence, were invited in to the process of making him a star. Brands can take note of this by inviting their consumers/fans in early as well, and letting them give their input in the creation of a product.

Bieber also went into detail discussing how fans have always been there for him, and he thanked them for everything they’ve done, no matter how big or small. They’ve tweeted about him and retweeted his links, bought his albums, merchandise and movie tickets, attended his concerts, made shirts, signs, and more. Many of the actions he mentioned related to fans sharing their love on social…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day:  “Young and Hungry are short 30 minute shows, so I can watch it on my lunch breaks at work. I like the humor and the characters. The story line is easy to follow. It's an easy show to binge watch.”—Female, 20, WS

Following Gatorade’s lead, Under Armour has added their own sponsored game to Snapchat. By swiping up on the brand’s 10-second ad, users can play “It Comes From Below,” an “endless runner” game featuring NFL star Cam Newton dodging obstacles like trees and wolves. The game also allows players to snap and send their scores to friends, along with a prompt to play themselves. Under Armour hopes to reach the 14-22-year-old high school and college athletes using the platform. (Adweek)

Coach is scrapping its mobile app to focus on chat instead. Deeming the app “no longer viable,” the luxury brand is shifting from convincing young consumers to come to their platform to going to where they already are, as part of their “ongoing comeback plan.” The new interactive Coachmoji iMessage keyboard can be used to create sharable mood boards depicting themes from their Spring 2017 collection. In the two weeks since the keyboard’s launch, daily engagement has reportedly already surpassed their former app. (Glossy)

The Obama administration is trying new and aggressive approaches to get young adults to sign up for health insurance. Less than 30% of the 13 million people who have signed up for coverage under the Affordable Care Act so far have been 18-34-year-olds—a group critical to the law’s success. To reach uninsured under-35-year-olds, the administration plans to advertise on video platform Twitch, and social networks like Facebook, Snapchat, and Tumblr. The campaign will revolve around the hashtag #HeavyAdulting and focus on medical issues most relevant to the group, like reproductive health. (The Wall Street Journal)

Family-friendly brands are creating content for Mattel’s updated View-Master toy. The Littlstar Family app—which can be uploaded on to an Apple or Android and then used along with Mattel’s virtual reality and 360-degree capable View-Master—will feature an extensive library of content from National Geographic, Disney, Bento Box Entertainment and Discovery Channel. Focused on immersive, Mattel also plans to launch a VR Batman experience for the toy this fall(Kidscreen

General Motors is going after experience-hungry young consumers who would rather share a car than own one. Their new start-up brand Maven offers a car sharing service that can paid for by the hour or day (no membership fee) and will be “rolling out city-by-city.” To market the new service, the brand sought out “local experts and connoisseurs” to tell stories that will “bring new cities to life.” An additional Maven service that will offer rides to airports will also be launched soon. (Ad Age)  

Quote of the Day: "My favorite show is New Girl  because it makes me feel like I'm hanging out with my friends. It's so funny, relatable, and relaxed. It's also convenient to watch for free on the Fox website.”—Female, 20, IL

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