Unlocking The Power Of “Belieber” Marketing

Bieber in WingsWhether you’re a Belieber or not, there’s no denying that Justin Bieber has long been a teen phenomenon and is a model in the marketing world as well. He’s built an army of loyal fans from social media, paved the way for other artists to do the same, and remains a powerhouse performer and teen idol. We attended his concert at Madison Square Garden last night, where it became eminently clear why he’s still a favorite among tweens, teens, and twentysomethings; he continuously celebrates fans for being a part of his journey and for believing in him. This authentic attitude and his enormous appreciation for his fans is something that marketers across all industries can learn from and adopt.

Fans have always been a huge part of Bieber’s success from making his YouTube videos go viral to showing up at events to support him. Throughout the concert last night, he kept thanking his fans for all that they’ve done and even took time to express this in video form. Various clips of him circa his childhood YouTube days were shown on screen and Bieber noted how his fans helped discover and launch him to stardom. As a result, fans feel a strong attachment to him since they knew of him before he was famous, and in essence, were invited in to the process of making him a star. Brands can take note of this by inviting their consumers/fans in early as well, and letting them give their input in the creation of a product.

Bieber also went into detail discussing how fans have always been there for him, and he thanked them for everything they’ve done, no matter how big or small. They’ve tweeted about him and retweeted his links, bought his albums, merchandise and movie tickets, attended his concerts, made shirts, signs, and more. Many of the actions he mentioned related to fans sharing their love on social…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “The issue I am most passionate about is LGBTQ, because in the words of Dr. Seuss ‘A person is a person, no matter how small.’” –Female, 18, KY

Being able to mix up a good cocktail is an attractive quality to Millennials. A recent study commissioned by Southern Comfort found that 70% of single 21-34-year-olds who drink alcohol at least once a month would date a mixologist, and almost all (94%) say that they’re impressed by someone who can make a good drink. The survey on singles also found that 10% are intimated by whiskey (though we know that more of the generation is embracing it) and 44% are planning to stay home and cook for Valentine’s Day (which makes sense seeing as “home-cooked meal” is on their top 15 Valentine’s gift list this year). (Los Angeles Times)

Brands looking to get Millennials on their side need to speak to them—not like them. A survey on brand communication reveals that young consumers aren’t responsive to companies that use slang, emojis, and celebrity quotes. Two-thirds don’t find words like “bae” and “yasss” effective on social media platforms, 70% don’t like it when you say “on fleek,” and 83% think using abbreviations like LOL and FOMO are “a poor attempt by brands to relate to them.” Another word you should steer clear of is “Millennial”—42% loathe when advertisers say it. What’s important is communicating effectively without trying so hard to be “hip” (another word you shouldn’t use). (Adweek

Toyota’s Scion brand launched to build cars for the non-conformist Millennial, but the quirky line is being shut down. The unique-looking vehicle was originally a hit for younger consumers and Toyota reports that 50% of buyers were under 35-years-old. But sales peaked in 2006, and have been falling—not because those younger consumers stopped buying cars, but because they’re more interested in “performance and safety” than colorful design. For brands, the lesson may be that focusing on quality is “a better strategy than pursuing the ever-changing perception of cool.” (Forbes

As Millennials deal with the repercussions of student debt and low income, they may be turning to risky financial solutions to help them get by. The number of consumers taking out personal loans increased by 18% between 2013 and 2015, and a Bankrate survey found that 18% of 18-29-year-olds say they are very or somewhat likely to use a personal loan this year—more than any other age group. With 63% of U.S. adults lacking emergency funds, personal loans have become an easy option to get money quickly without negatively affecting their credit scores. (MarketWatchBankrate)

Time Inc. is continuing their pursuit of Millennial women with Motto, a new website targeting young female consumers with articles on “work, life, and play.” Time Digital’s managing editor reports that, “an enormous amount of [Time, Inc.’s] traffic, especially in social media, is about self-improvement and living a better life.” Motto will feature such “inspirational and motivational” daily stories and video content, which will be posted to Facebook and YouTube, written by Time magazine staffers, celebrities, and politicians. They expect more than 50% of readers to access the site through mobile and tablet. (The Wall Street Journal

Quote of the Day: “I learned to cook through ship to home meals like Blue Apron.” –Male, 24, IL

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