The Millennial Mindset Of Self-Teaching

Today’s post comes from Ypulse team member Mel Tchalim. He and several other Ypulse staffers recently took part in a four-week online workshop that teaches people how to teach themselves anything. Sounds handy, right? The course, titled “Learn Anything On Your Own,” was taught by a teen entrepreneur and Thiel Fellow who embodies the idea that people have the power to teach themselves anything with the right tools, resources, discipline, and organization. Mel shares his experience in this course below and discusses how this attitude — to teach yourself anything — is a very Millennial concept. His generation has grown up with the mindset that they can teach themselves whatever they want with a few clicks, the support of their network, and of course, resourcefulness.

The Millennial Mindset Of Self-Teaching

Male at a computerEarlier this month, I decided to take part in an online class for fun. Interestingly enough, the premise of the class was not to teach us anything per se, but rather to show us how we could teach ourselves anything of our choosing.

The methodology was simple, and in my opinion, fairly effective:

Step 1 was to decide what we wanted to learn, start to set goals for ourselves, and collect learning resources. I chose to learn how to start a business. I wasn’t building a particular business in the class, but rather looking to gain an understanding of how one would do this. One of my colleagues at Ypulse on the other hand chose to teach herself how to learn a language. We were advised to keep a learning journal and detail our time commitments. Step 2 was to set up a peer accountability group, which meant teaming up with other students to share goals and keep each other on track. Step 3 was to look for mentors – people who knew what we wanted to learn and could point us in the right…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I participated in Bikram Yoga, because I found a few YouTube tutorials on it.” –Female, 24, MN

Being featured in the (racy) lyrics of Beyoncé’s hit single “Formation” has caused Red Lobster’s sales to spike 33%. But a wave of frustration hit Twitter after the brand took too long to respond to the song, and failed to live up to expectations. One user advised,“Yo @redlobster, all you have to do is NOT f*** up. Just give the Twitter over to your highest ranking Black person under 33. Trust me.” But after eight hours Red Lobster tweeted an underwhelming: "Cheddar Bey Biscuits" has a nice ring to it,don't you think? #Formation @Beyonce.” The indecent highlights what young consumers expect from brands on social media. (MediaPostBuzzFeed)

The newly funded Stash investment app is hoping to “break down the barriers that prevent nearly three quarters of Millennials from investing.” To appeal to the risk-averse generation, the app allows users to invest as little as $5, and describes investments in easy theme-like terms, like “Clean and Green.” For the founders it’s all about setting up users for the long-term: “By lowering the minimum level of investment, enabling Millennials to invest in broad themes that they care about, and guiding them along the path toward building smart lifelong investment habits, Stash has the potential to empower an entire generation to reach their financial goals.” (Business Wire)

Fit has gone glam for Millennials—and not just in the U.S. Young Chinese women are embracing working out, and shifting traditional beauty ideals. In a 2003 survey, 1,000 working females cited an ideal body to be "an almost-emaciated, willowy physique," but social media and celebrity influence, as well as more awareness to physical health, are making strength the new goal. Women sharing their fitness journeys are becoming major influencers and creating new personal brands, and the fitness industry in China has grown 13% yearly since 2010. (Refinery29)

ESports—multi-player competitive video gaming—is expected to generate $463 million in ticket sales, merchandise, sponsorships, and advertising for 2016, and networks want a piece of the action. But can it translate to TV? TBS is premiering E-League, a 10-week eSports competition series that will stand as a true test on whether the phenomenon can “find the right balance between achieving scale and retaining its core audience of digitally forward young men.” Critics have good reason to be skeptical: ESPN2’s airing of an eSports college competition perplexed viewers, frustrated broadcasters, and scored a 0.1 Nielsen rating. (Adweek

British director Anthony Wilcox’s new action-packed thriller,Shield 5, is captivating audiences—the Instagram audience that is. The series, which currently has 30,000 followers, is being called “social cinema,” and each episode is the length of an Instagram video: just 15-seconds. Wilcox’s love for fast-turnaround projects and very low budget is what ultimately inspired him to choose the platform. There was also the potential to go viral: "If you’ve got the opportunity to show your work to a much, much bigger audience…all around the world, it might be worth trying it." (Fast Company

Quote of the Day: “I share my selfies by making it my profile picture.” —Female, 23, IL

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