The Glamour Women Of The Year Awards Highlight The Power Of Female Millennials

Today's post comes from Youth Advisory Board member Alexis, who attended the Glamour Women of the Year Awards earlier this week. She discusses how inspiring the awards ceremony was in honoring women of all ages, across all fields, and in particular, the Millennial women who have made a difference this year. She explains what stood out below and how women are changing the world.

Glamour Women of the Year AwardsOn Monday night, I had the opportunity to attend Glamour’s 22nd Women of the Year Awards. The event took place at Carnegie Hall and was filled with influential people from all over the community, most of whom were women, including many Millennials! As a Millennial woman myself, I was extremely inspired by each of the winner’s speeches and how these individuals are shaping the world.

Ten awards were given to outstanding women who have exhibited some sort of achievement or contributed to a cause they are passionate about. From Selena Gomez and Lena Dunham to the Olympic gold medalists and child sexual abuse advocate, Erin Merryn, each of these women has done something that's important to them and they're being recognized by the entire community for being amazing role models. Women of all ages were honored, but I was especially moved by these young people who proved the power of my generation. Selena Gomez, known as “The Independent Spirit,” is UNICEF’s youngest student ambassador and has traveled to Ghana for the organization. Lena Dunham, known as “The Voice of a Generation,” created and stars in this year’s most-talked-about television show, “Girls.” The Olympic gold medalists, known as “The Unstoppables,” are role models for all women wishing to compete in sports, especially as this year marked the first time that more women than men made the U.S. Olympic team. And finally, Erin Merryn, known as “The…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “My favorite app is Snapchat, because it offers quick messaging with a time limit that ensures privacy while being highly entertaining.”—Female, 20, FL 

If you want to know what teens are doing online, don’t ask their parents. A survey by the National Cyber Security Alliance found that 60% of 13-17-year-olds have a secret online account they say their parents know nothing about, while only 27% of parents suspect their kids have one. This statistic will likely worry parents who are increasingly monitoring online behavior. About 67% of parents say they have a rule in place for kids to be open with them about any “sort of uncomfortable or scary incidents that occur online,” however only 32% of teens surveyed say that such a rule exists in their household. (CNET)

Millennials around the are not only passionate about global issues, but ready to take them on. A World Economic Forum survey found that seven in ten 18-35-year-olds see abundant opportunities for themselves and their peers to tackle global issues, and half believe they have decision making power in their home countries. When the WEF asked about the three most serious issues affecting the world today, Millennials had the same response as the year before: religious conflicts came in third with 33.8% of responses, large scale conflict and wars came in second with 38.5% of responses, and climate change and destruction of natural resources was the top response with 45.2% of respondents. (Business Insider)

Outlet malls are thriving, and it’s all thanks to men and thrifty Millennials. According to Cowen & Co.’s latest Consumer Tracker Survey, outlet visitation by 18-34-year-old men reached a new peak of 44% in July, most likely due to male preference for brand stores over department retailers. Overall Millennial visitation is also up: on average, 31% of 18-34-year-old women and 35% of 18-34-year-old men say they visited an outlet mall every month between December 2012 and July 2016. An analyst of NPD Group attributes the trend to frugal Millennials who would rather save their cash for experiences. (MarketWatch

Teenage girls with depression or anxiety “are less alone than ever.” The Department of Education has revealed that these mental illnesses are a slowly growing epidemic among teen girls in England: about one third report having depression or anxiety, a 10% increase over the last decade. Social media pressure, bullying, and unrealistic body expectations are all cited as factors, which have especially effected young girls all over the world. In America, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration reports that teen girls are three times more likely to be depressed than their male counterparts. (Teen Vogue)

Instagram has made connecting with consumers even easier for brands. The platform’s new “contact” button allows users to call, text, or email brands through their profiles. According to a social media specialist, “social…is a brand’s first line of defense—both for reputation management and customer service,” and the new button eliminates the hassle of having to respond to each individual comment. Brands like Nordstrom, Delta, and Denny’s are already utilizing the new feature. (Digiday

Quote of the Day: “My favorite app is Pokémon Go, because it's kinda a big deal for those of us who've been dreaming about it for over a decade.”—Female, 21, NJ 

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