The Friday Don’t Miss List

Your weekly round-up of the topics we’ve covered this week along with all the things that might not have made it in our posts the first time around, but that you should not miss…

 

 

 

 

1. Close Encounters at Comic-Con

Our post on Comic-Con gave you three of the big reveals of the conference, but don’t miss some of the other major things that happened over the weekend, including Breaking Bad star Brian Cranston walking through the halls unrecognized in a mask of his own face. Or how up close and personal encounters like the “Godzilla Encounter” are what attendees are looking for.

 

2. Crazy Cupid Dating

We talked about the rise of group dating services on Wednesday, but don’t miss that OkCupid, one of the grandfathers of dating sites, has also entered the market for Millennials with OkCupid Crazy Blind Date. Users pick a time and a place and the match is made for the blind date, encouraging young singles to be spontaneous and meet up whenever possible.

 

 

3. Kickstart It Up

Yesterday’s post on Kickstarter fashion stars featured a handy set of men’s briefs called the Speakeasys, with a pocket to hide flasks, money, or protection. But don’t miss hidden undies pockets for girls: the Boobypack. This sports-like bra, or “fannypack for your boobs,” holds and protects your valuables from excessive sweat and movement, and is available in bright neon colors to make it ideal for young ravers. The project has raised $32,725, passing its goal by 218% with 686 backers.

 

4. Registry Revolution

The wedding registry is going through some major changes thanks to Millennial marrieds-to-be. We covered a lot this week, but you shouldn’t miss NewlyWish, which lets users register for local boutiques, restaurants and vendors, bypassing major department stores. Some people though are

 
 

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The Newsfeed

Quote of the Day: “I get spending money from helping my neighbors with their computer problems.”—Male, 14, FL

Although controversial to some, influencer marketing isn’t going away any time soon. A new survey by influencer platform Linqia revealed that 94% of marketers across many industries believe influencer marketing to be effective, despite 78% saying that determining the ROI of the approach will be one of the top challenges of 2017. The top benefits cited were creating authentic content (87%), driving engagement (77%), and driving traffic to website (56%). (Adweek)

Vine stars are finding a new home on live stream app Live.ly. The app, a spin-off from the popular video network Musical.ly, generated half a million downloads in its first week by creating a platform where broadcasters can engage with viewers and stream as long as they like—and then there’s the money. According to Musical.ly, the top 10 broadcasters on the platform have made an average of $46,000 in the span of two weeks with a monetization model that lets users make contributions during streams. (Business Insider)

Self magazine is leaving print behind, and going all-digital. The publication has announced that February’s issue will be their last print production, and their new strategy will make them “uniquely positioned to give consumers more of what they love while creating innovative and engaging opportunities for our advertising partners.” The all-digital tactic is a first for a major Condé Nast magazine, and reflects the decreasing interest in print in the digital media era. (The Wall Street Journal)

Teens and kids are embracing tech even more than Millennials. A new Quizlet survey found that U.S. students 16-years-old and younger are 28% more likely than Millennials to say that technology helps them learn faster than traditional tools like worksheets and lectures. Their teachers were even more open to tech: they were 32% more likely than students to say learning tech is good use of classroom time, and 20% more likely to say devices make learning fun. (CNET)

Retirement may be on the outs. According to a Merrill Edge survey, 83% of “mass affluent” 18-34-year-olds say they will still work after they “retire,” “either for income, to keep busy, or to pursue a passion.” Getting to retirement will be a struggle in itself: Half of 18-24-year-olds and 24% of 24-34-year-olds say they will need a side job to reach their retirement savings goal, which three in four believe will be $1 million. (CNNMoney

Quote of the Day: “My favorite thing to do to have fun is stay at home and invite friends over.”—Male, 32, VA

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