The Friday Don’t Miss List

Here is your round up of trending topics we've covered this week and some things you might not have seen. In case you missed it…

 

 

 

 

 

Just Saying No to Pot Marketing
We covered Gen Y getting high and this generation leading the charge for the legal right to toke up, but is America ready for marijuana advertising? The answer at the moment (especially among parents of young children) seems to be a resounding no.  Still, it shouldn't be missed that marketers are already seeing dollar signs, funding cannabis-product networking events and dreaming up “Starbucks-style marijuana shops.”

 

 

 

 

 

We Told You: Divergent Getting Big
We covered the entertainment series that could become the next big thing this week, but don’t miss one that we had already talked up last year. We predicted the hype around YA series Divergent (written by a Millennial!) and now it has debuted at comic-con with an impressive cast list for its first big screen installment, currently in production. Starring as Tris, the gutsy female lead, Shailene Woodley is already being dubbed “the next Jennifer Lawrence.”

 

 

 

Are You the Catfish?
In case you didn’t know, Catfish matters. We let you know why in last week’s article about the MTV favorite that “puts the real back into reality.” Now don’t miss Buzzfeed’s amusing (and quite accurate) quiz to figure out your Catfish personality. Are you host Nev, “trying to balance the karmic retribution of exploiting a sweet, sad, middle-aged Midwestern woman” or the catfishee who “believed in the Tooth Fairy until your college years?”

 

Kanye’s White Tee Should Have WiFi
The popularity of Kanye West’s capsule collection for A.P.C. got mention in our Essentials this week, but don’t miss that the minimalist pieces have brought out some tough…

 
 

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The Newsfeed

Quote of the Day: “I get spending money from helping my neighbors with their computer problems.”—Male, 14, FL

Although controversial to some, influencer marketing isn’t going away any time soon. A new survey by influencer platform Linqia revealed that 94% of marketers across many industries believe influencer marketing to be effective, despite 78% saying that determining the ROI of the approach will be one of the top challenges of 2017. The top benefits cited were creating authentic content (87%), driving engagement (77%), and driving traffic to website (56%). (Adweek)

Vine stars are finding a new home on live stream app Live.ly. The app, a spin-off from the popular video network Musical.ly, generated half a million downloads in its first week by creating a platform where broadcasters can engage with viewers and stream as long as they like—and then there’s the money. According to Musical.ly, the top 10 broadcasters on the platform have made an average of $46,000 in the span of two weeks with a monetization model that lets users make contributions during streams. (Business Insider)

Self magazine is leaving print behind, and going all-digital. The publication has announced that February’s issue will be their last print production, and their new strategy will make them “uniquely positioned to give consumers more of what they love while creating innovative and engaging opportunities for our advertising partners.” The all-digital tactic is a first for a major Condé Nast magazine, and reflects the decreasing interest in print in the digital media era. (The Wall Street Journal)

Teens and kids are embracing tech even more than Millennials. A new Quizlet survey found that U.S. students 16-years-old and younger are 28% more likely than Millennials to say that technology helps them learn faster than traditional tools like worksheets and lectures. Their teachers were even more open to tech: they were 32% more likely than students to say learning tech is good use of classroom time, and 20% more likely to say devices make learning fun. (CNET)

Retirement may be on the outs. According to a Merrill Edge survey, 83% of “mass affluent” 18-34-year-olds say they will still work after they “retire,” “either for income, to keep busy, or to pursue a passion.” Getting to retirement will be a struggle in itself: Half of 18-24-year-olds and 24% of 24-34-year-olds say they will need a side job to reach their retirement savings goal, which three in four believe will be $1 million. (CNNMoney

Quote of the Day: “My favorite thing to do to have fun is stay at home and invite friends over.”—Male, 32, VA

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