The Drawbacks Of Being A Boomerang Kid

Today's post comes from Ypulse team member Casandra Liggin.

The Drawbacks of Being A Boomerang Kid

Boomerang KidsThe day I left to go to college, I knew there was no looking back. As my parents drove away and left me all alone in my dorm room, I knew the adolescent chapter of my life was closing for good. Sure, my parents would have let me come back home if I had experienced a major medical emergency, but anything short of that was pushing it. They had been prepping me for independence from the time I entered high school. I knew it was my duty to not only graduate with a degree, but also graduate with the type of degree that would allow me to be 100% self-sufficient. Going back home just wasn’t an option and I’m not so sure that was a bad thing. 

I’m an Xer, but for Millennials today, going home may be their first option. Yes, many members of this generation have been fondly described as “boomerang kids” because they are returning home after college for not a week or even a month, but to stay indefinitely. A recent Pew study reports that 41% of adults between 25 and 29 are now living or have lived recently, with their parents. Several are doing this because of the recession and the lack of self-sustaining jobs, while others truly don’t mind going back home to live with their parents. Millennials consider their parents to be their friends and a part of their primary support network. I’m also sure living at home provides more comfort than sleeping on a friend’s couch.

Other Millennials are pained by the idea of settling for a less than ideal occupation rather than pursuing their passions. I think passions are wonderful, I truly do. But I also believe in working until one can draft the desired path to achieve their passion. Work experience of any kind is extremely valuable as it teaches you…

 
 

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Quote of the Day: “There are better things to spend my money on [than luxury products], so unless we are talking about luxury experiences, I'm not spending money on them right now.”

—Female, 30, CA

As we predicted, there’s still hope for in-store shopping. According to a Forrester retail expert and analyst, U.S. retail revenue is expected to reach $3.4 trillion this year, and only 9% is expected to be online. Because consumers still value the ability to “touch and feel products,” retailers with “solid go-to-market strategies,” like Sephora with their digital solutions and Ulta with their unique shopping experience, stand to benefit the most. He reports that only those retailers “struggling to connect with consumers” are closing stores. (MediaPost

Will Instagram take Snapchat’s place as a marketing star of 2017? The platform, which boasts 150 million daily users, is now letting brands incorporate full screen ads to the Snapchat-inspired Stories feature, and companies like Capital One, ASOS, Nike, Buick, and Airbnb are already on board. According to the VP of Instagram Business, brands will be able to target specific audiences through the feature, and one-third of the app’s top stories have been from businesses. (Adweek

LGBT self-identification is rising in the U.S., with Millennials leading the way. According to a Gallup survey, 4.1% of U.S. adults, or about 10 million people, now identify as LGBT—an increase from 3.5% in 2012. Millennials account for almost 60% of that number, most likely because they are “first generation in the U.S. to grow up in an environment where social acceptance of the LGBT community markedly increased.” Our Genreless Generation trend, revealed that Millennials and teens are more comfortable with blending and bending categories, and celebrating new combinations than ever before. (NYMag)

The Binge Effect has inspired Disney to try out the Netflix model. For the premiere of Beyond on Millennial-focused network Freeform, all 10 episodes were released online with fewer ads than shown on TV—a first for the channel. The series, about a young man who discovers he has superpowers after awakening from a 12-year coma, drew in 14.2 million viewers in its first week, with almost half watching online. (Bloomberg

Millennials are skipping YouTube ads, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing. An analysis by LaunchLeap revealed that 59% of Millennials are skipping YouTube’s TrueView ads—those that advertisers only pay for if they are watched to completion. On the other hand, 29% are watching ads to completion—better engagement than on Snapchat. And they’re paying attention: a Google and Ipsos study found that attention paid to YouTube ads is 84% higher than advertising on TV. (Business Insider

Quote of the Day: "I binge-watch content to spend time with my spouse.”—Female, 32, OK 

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