Teen Mag Roundup

Today we’ve pulled the need-to-know trends from teen reads SeventeenNYLON, and J-14 to update you with what matters to teenage consumers.
 
SEVENTEEN
 
Celebrating Rebellion: Miley Cyrus’ fandom, know as the “Smilers,” weigh in on what makes their idol so charismatic. Gracie, a 17-year-old who runs a Miley fan account on Twitter with 35,000 followers, quotes: “I respect her because she does exactly what she wants and never second-guesses herself. I envy that kind of confidence.” Though her transition from Disney tween to controversial pop-icon has been a shock for some original fans, Millennials enjoy being entertained by what is out of their comfort zone since they avoid extreme rebellion in their own lives.
 
Bye-Bye Barely There Swimwear: Say goodbye to the long-heralded string bikini and hello to graphic print one-pieces and high-rise bikini bottoms. Girls increasingly want their intimates and swimwear to look like everyday clothing, so thick-strapped and off-the-shoulder crop tops for swim will be must-haves, showing that covering up is especially cool right now.
 
Selfies Still Got It: 62% of readers are into the #Selfie music video which currently has over 78 million views on YouTube. The song has been riffed on in countless Vine videos and pokes fun at Millennial social media habits while also glorifying selfie behavior.
 
Chick Lit Page Turner: Debuting April 22nd is a book from E! News correspondent Ken Baker called How I Got Skinny, Famous, and Fell Madly in Love. Though the title sounds stereotypical, the story is a sarcasm-laden account of a girl’s struggle with being overweight and the motivation she builds to turn her life around. Reviewers call it “sassy” and “honest” as an empowering piece of chick lit for young readers.
 
NYLON
 
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The Newsfeed

“Art is basically my job and I enjoy it so much.”—Female, 15, MD

Snap is making its “biggest move” in scripted original content, teaming up with NBCUniversal and the Duplass brothers for their next series. The Duplass-owned creative studio Donut will produce original series for Snap shot in vertical video. NBCU and Snap will also be opening a joint digital content studio focused completely on mobile-first entertainment, “formaliz[ing] their partnership” and putting Snap firmly in the producing/original content creation camp. Snap’s mobile-only approach is part of a movement to shake up how we view videos—in fact, they’re calling their offering “a fundamentally new medium.” (THRTechCrunch)

Eggo frozen waffles are capitalizing on their unexpected Stranger Things’ fame. The brand has seized the marketing opportunity of being a part of one of Millennials & Gen Z’s favorite shows, tying themselves into Netflix’s Super Bowl ad, creating a special toaster for select fans, and swarming New York Comic Con with people dressed up like Eleven armed with “watch party kits” (aka “waffles and a microwavable syrup server”). To prep for the premiere of season two of the show, Eggo is sending out a fully-loaded food truck for the red carpet premiere, and going all out on social media to connect with fans. (MediaPost)

More teens than ever have severe anxiety, but why? The American College Health Association found a 12% increase in undergrads reporting “overwhelming anxiety” from 2011 to 2016, and several studies concur that “there’s just been a steady increase of severely anxious students.” Social media is part of the problem—constant like-monitoring and cyber bullying isn’t helping the most stressed generation to date. There’s also an increasing (and constant) perceived need to over-achieve. One psychology professor observes, “There’s always one more activity, one more A.P. class, one more thing to do in order to get into a top college.” (NYTimes)

Ypulse research has shown that 88% of Millennial parents are trying to avoid helicopter parenting—but they might not be able to help it. The constant media storm of global atrocities and everyday stories of parenting gone wrong combined with advertisers’ willingness to fear-monger, results in a generation of (understandably) anxious parents. It doesn’t help that the tech to constantly monitor kids is easily available (albeit pricey)—from drone surveillance meant for the military to devices that track “blood-oxygen levels all night long.” One relationship therapist sums up, “Everyone is having a hard time drawing a line and just figuring out what’s reasonable versus what’s over-protective.” (Refinery29)

Brands are turning college students into mini-sales forces. Aerie, Victoria’s Secret Pink, and Express are just a few of the many brands that have a program for college campus reps where students receive swag, experience, and other perks for helping bring brand awareness to their colleges. Though brands don’t always require social posts, most ambassadors do share their swag on social, bringing organic ads to their friends’ feeds. The biggest draw is that social posts from reps “[come] across as natural, authentic, a product that they would normally use or want to talk about.” (Racked)

“[Celebrity] can mean anything nowadays and it's a rather diluted term; from YouTube star, to someone on Instagram with millions of followers, to reality TV dopes, etc.”—Male, 30, WI

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