Teen Mag Roundup

Not a teen mag subscriber? You're in luck. We've flipped through the pages of Teen Vogue, Seventeen, and NYLON to keep you in touch with what trends are rising among teens and their idols.

TEEN VOGUE
 
Real Teen Queen: Lorde has become a household name in less than a year, and her goth pop aura is only a stage front for the “self-awareness, humility, and, yes, even awkwardness” that make up her unlikely girl-next-door appeal. The fact that she admits to acne struggles and remembers that “not long ago I had 500 Twitter followers” makes her as real of a celebrity as they come, and appeals to Millennials’ cravings for imperfect celebrity idols.
 
Fashion’s Blurred Lines: Women in tailored tuxes, men in skirts: androgynous dressing has evolved into a full-on style switch for some. The trickle-down from runway and street to mainstream has been seen in seasons past with oversized men’s watches and button-ups for females, and now young guys like Justin Bieber and Jaden Smith are donning baggy, skirt-like silhouettes created by forward-thinking brands like Hood by Air, which made waves during fashion week this winter with a gender bending promotion.
 
Young Talent Series: Teen Vogue will be debuting the new series Strictly Ballet on its YouTube channel, which will follow six young students at the School of American Ballet as they train and fight for a spot in the acclaimed New York City Ballet. Learning the ins and outs of young performers following their dreams may inspire others to follow suit, and will give light to the dedication and sport of ballet that other brands, like Free People, have struggled to represent.
 
Dreams Into Reality: Years ago, college students were ushered into practical majors that would guarantee a stable position in the job market, but many urban-based young grads…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I follow the news because it’s there and I can't avoid it.”—Female, 28, ME

Nike has taken the gold in Olympic ad engagement with a focus on authenticity. The brand’s 2016 Rio Olympic Games campaign “stepped beyond” “Just Do It” with a series of spots showing average people pushing themselves beyond their limits. The response to the approach has been overwhelmingly positive–viewers of one ad featuring a mountain climber born without arms and legs called it their “new favorite Nike video.” The campaign exceeded “any other brand in engagement rates,” earning 6.7 million shares and 6.5 million likes and favorites since March. (MediaPost

Facebook is taking a new swipe at Snapchat with a new camera-first app for teens only. Lifestage, created by a 19-year-old former Facebook intern, reimagines the original Facebook experience for teens today with profile pages filled with video clips and filters. Currently, the app’s network is limited to high school and undergrad students—users over the age of 21 can only see their own profiles. However, teens can see the profiles of all other users, “inside and outside” their schools, which could make privacy a concern. Facebook’s previous standalone apps have not found much success, leading the site to shut down their Creative Labs division last year. (The Daily Dot,BuzzFeed)

Unable to compete with social media, The New York Times is putting an end to its Millennial news app. NYT Now was launched in 2014 in an effort to lure in young readers with conversational content at a discounted price. After failing to attract new users, the app dropped its paywall for a freemium model that let users read up to 10 free articles a month. The updated strategy still did little to bring in a younger audience, averaging 257,000 unique users in the past three months. (Business Insider

College students are increasingly taking their athletic talents off the field. At many colleges, you don’t need to play traditional sports like football, track, or lacrosse to be a star athlete—instead, students are opting for sports that require “little prerequisite talent and less on-field aggression,” like ultimate Frisbee, rock climbing, fishing, and wood-chopping tournaments. Many of these alt-sport players discover the new competitive activities because they don’t fit the strict requirements to join other sports teams, and say inclusive team spirit and lack of competitive strife between opponents are major draws. (The Wall Street Journal

Most beauty brands are trying to draw in younger consumers, and Estée Lauder has strategic plans to keep Millennials happy. The brand’s recent profit boost was mostly generated by “color cosmetics brands like Estée Lauder, SmashboxMAC and Clinique,” but prestige fragrance and skin care continue to suffer. They plan to revive the segment by focusing on “selfie culture,” and count on the social media strategy that has fueled their makeup success to work on “instant-gratification” products like face masks and moisturizers. Partnerships with digital influencers, including those with lower but highly engaged followings, are also in the plans. (Fashionista)

Quote of the Day: “I like yoga because It can be used for the body, mind, breath, and soul if desired. I can do it alone or with other people. It can also be as short or long as I want.”—Female, 27, AR

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