Teen Mag Roundup

Not a teen mag subscriber? You're in luck. We've flipped through the pages of Teen Vogue, Seventeen, and NYLON to keep you in touch with what trends are rising among teens and their idols.

TEEN VOGUE
 
Real Teen Queen: Lorde has become a household name in less than a year, and her goth pop aura is only a stage front for the “self-awareness, humility, and, yes, even awkwardness” that make up her unlikely girl-next-door appeal. The fact that she admits to acne struggles and remembers that “not long ago I had 500 Twitter followers” makes her as real of a celebrity as they come, and appeals to Millennials’ cravings for imperfect celebrity idols.
 
Fashion’s Blurred Lines: Women in tailored tuxes, men in skirts: androgynous dressing has evolved into a full-on style switch for some. The trickle-down from runway and street to mainstream has been seen in seasons past with oversized men’s watches and button-ups for females, and now young guys like Justin Bieber and Jaden Smith are donning baggy, skirt-like silhouettes created by forward-thinking brands like Hood by Air, which made waves during fashion week this winter with a gender bending promotion.
 
Young Talent Series: Teen Vogue will be debuting the new series Strictly Ballet on its YouTube channel, which will follow six young students at the School of American Ballet as they train and fight for a spot in the acclaimed New York City Ballet. Learning the ins and outs of young performers following their dreams may inspire others to follow suit, and will give light to the dedication and sport of ballet that other brands, like Free People, have struggled to represent.
 
Dreams Into Reality: Years ago, college students were ushered into practical majors that would guarantee a stable position in the job market, but many urban-based young grads…

 
 

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The Newsfeed

Quote of the Day: “My 2017 resolution is to improve my dog's confidence- She's somewhat fearful.”—Female, 28, PA

At some malls, teens “have worn our their welcome.” Cases of teens banding together on social media and going to malls to create chaos have reportedly been increasing over recent years. To avoid giving consumers another reason to shop online, some shopping centers—105 in the U.S. according to the International Council of Shopping Centers—have responded by imposing curfews and bans on the young consumers. The legality of such restrictions has been called to question, with the ACLU working to fight discrimination at play. (LA Times)

Millennial parents are getting by with a little—ok, maybe a lot—of help from their own parents. A TD Ameritrade survey has found that 19-37-year-olds who have kids get $11,000 on average from their parents through financial support or unpaid labor, and more than half get assistance through childcare or housekeeping weekly. But the assistance isn’t one-sided: three-quarters of 50-70-year-olds with Millennial children say they’re glad to help, and four in ten Millennials say they help their parents too, with an average of $2000 in 2016. (USA TODAYBusiness Wire)

The NFL is looking outside their traditional playbook to reach young fans. The league has partnered with AwesomenessTV for In The NFL, a new series that “lifts the curtain” to give a behind-the-scenes look at the sport. Since "a 17-year-old girl doesn't want to watch the same content as her mom or her dad,” some episodes have a young female focus, with one starring YouTube stars the Merrell twins taking a tour of a stadium, and another featuring one of the few female owners in the NFL, Kim Pegula, offering career tips to young women. (Adweek)

Can the future generation of shoppers save brick-and-mortar retail? Maybe. A new IBM and National Retail Federation study has revealed that 67% of 13-21-year-olds shop in-store most of the time, while another 31% occasionally buy from them. One analyst notes that their desire for “hands-on experience” is setting their preferences, but lack of credit cards and life stage are also likely forces deterring them from online shopping—and we predict that if fintech solutions are developed with teens in mind it could be a fatal blow for physical teen retailers. (RackedBusiness Wire

The sharing economy may be impacting Millennial spending. Research by Hammerson and retail consultant Verdict found that more than half of Millennials used a sharing economy business like Uber or Airbnb in the last year, compared to 16.2% of those over 35-years-old. Nearly a quarter of Millennials say they aren’t concerned about home ownership and would be content with renting for the rest of their lives, and when compared to those over 35-year-olds, they're two times more likely to agree that there are some products they don’t need to own and would prefer to rent. (Forbes

Quote of the Day: “My 2017 resolution is to live my life the way Carrie Fisher would have wanted me to.”—Female, 21, TX

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