Teen Mag Roundup

Not a teen mag subscriber? You're in luck. We've flipped through the pages of Teen Vogue, Seventeen, and NYLON to keep you in touch with what trends are rising among teens and their idols.

TEEN VOGUE
 
Real Teen Queen: Lorde has become a household name in less than a year, and her goth pop aura is only a stage front for the “self-awareness, humility, and, yes, even awkwardness” that make up her unlikely girl-next-door appeal. The fact that she admits to acne struggles and remembers that “not long ago I had 500 Twitter followers” makes her as real of a celebrity as they come, and appeals to Millennials’ cravings for imperfect celebrity idols.
 
Fashion’s Blurred Lines: Women in tailored tuxes, men in skirts: androgynous dressing has evolved into a full-on style switch for some. The trickle-down from runway and street to mainstream has been seen in seasons past with oversized men’s watches and button-ups for females, and now young guys like Justin Bieber and Jaden Smith are donning baggy, skirt-like silhouettes created by forward-thinking brands like Hood by Air, which made waves during fashion week this winter with a gender bending promotion.
 
Young Talent Series: Teen Vogue will be debuting the new series Strictly Ballet on its YouTube channel, which will follow six young students at the School of American Ballet as they train and fight for a spot in the acclaimed New York City Ballet. Learning the ins and outs of young performers following their dreams may inspire others to follow suit, and will give light to the dedication and sport of ballet that other brands, like Free People, have struggled to represent.
 
Dreams Into Reality: Years ago, college students were ushered into practical majors that would guarantee a stable position in the job market, but many urban-based young grads…

 
 

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The Newsfeed

Quote of the Day: “I get spending money from helping my neighbors with their computer problems.”—Male, 14, FL

Although controversial to some, influencer marketing isn’t going away any time soon. A new survey by influencer platform Linqia revealed that 94% of marketers across many industries believe influencer marketing to be effective, despite 78% saying that determining the ROI of the approach will be one of the top challenges of 2017. The top benefits cited were creating authentic content (87%), driving engagement (77%), and driving traffic to website (56%). (Adweek)

Vine stars are finding a new home on live stream app Live.ly. The app, a spin-off from the popular video network Musical.ly, generated half a million downloads in its first week by creating a platform where broadcasters can engage with viewers and stream as long as they like—and then there’s the money. According to Musical.ly, the top 10 broadcasters on the platform have made an average of $46,000 in the span of two weeks with a monetization model that lets users make contributions during streams. (Business Insider)

Self magazine is leaving print behind, and going all-digital. The publication has announced that February’s issue will be their last print production, and their new strategy will make them “uniquely positioned to give consumers more of what they love while creating innovative and engaging opportunities for our advertising partners.” The all-digital tactic is a first for a major Condé Nast magazine, and reflects the decreasing interest in print in the digital media era. (The Wall Street Journal)

Teens and kids are embracing tech even more than Millennials. A new Quizlet survey found that U.S. students 16-years-old and younger are 28% more likely than Millennials to say that technology helps them learn faster than traditional tools like worksheets and lectures. Their teachers were even more open to tech: they were 32% more likely than students to say learning tech is good use of classroom time, and 20% more likely to say devices make learning fun. (CNET)

Retirement may be on the outs. According to a Merrill Edge survey, 83% of “mass affluent” 18-34-year-olds say they will still work after they “retire,” “either for income, to keep busy, or to pursue a passion.” Getting to retirement will be a struggle in itself: Half of 18-24-year-olds and 24% of 24-34-year-olds say they will need a side job to reach their retirement savings goal, which three in four believe will be $1 million. (CNNMoney

Quote of the Day: “My favorite thing to do to have fun is stay at home and invite friends over.”—Male, 32, VA

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