Teen Mag Roundup

Not a teen mag subscriber? You're in luck. We've flipped through the pages of Teen Vogue, Seventeen, and NYLON to keep you in touch with what trends are rising among teens and their idols.

TEEN VOGUE
 
Real Teen Queen: Lorde has become a household name in less than a year, and her goth pop aura is only a stage front for the “self-awareness, humility, and, yes, even awkwardness” that make up her unlikely girl-next-door appeal. The fact that she admits to acne struggles and remembers that “not long ago I had 500 Twitter followers” makes her as real of a celebrity as they come, and appeals to Millennials’ cravings for imperfect celebrity idols.
 
Fashion’s Blurred Lines: Women in tailored tuxes, men in skirts: androgynous dressing has evolved into a full-on style switch for some. The trickle-down from runway and street to mainstream has been seen in seasons past with oversized men’s watches and button-ups for females, and now young guys like Justin Bieber and Jaden Smith are donning baggy, skirt-like silhouettes created by forward-thinking brands like Hood by Air, which made waves during fashion week this winter with a gender bending promotion.
 
Young Talent Series: Teen Vogue will be debuting the new series Strictly Ballet on its YouTube channel, which will follow six young students at the School of American Ballet as they train and fight for a spot in the acclaimed New York City Ballet. Learning the ins and outs of young performers following their dreams may inspire others to follow suit, and will give light to the dedication and sport of ballet that other brands, like Free People, have struggled to represent.
 
Dreams Into Reality: Years ago, college students were ushered into practical majors that would guarantee a stable position in the job market, but many urban-based young grads…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I share my selfies by making it my profile picture.” —Female, 23, IL

It’s time to let go of the stereotype that men hate shopping: men are actually spending about $10 more than women on clothing and accessories each month, according to a new study. Menswear is expected to expand by 8.3% in the next year, 4.1% more than womenswear. Not surprisingly, Millennial guys are approaching their fashion and shopping differently, with males under 35-years-old more likely to purchase athletic and athleisure styles. Younger male consumers are also 27% more likely than those over 35-years-old to be influenced by sales staff. (The Muse)

Second screen marketing was one of the big trends of this Sunday’s big game, and Instagram reports that 38 million users engaged with Super Bowl content 155 million times that day. Social media vendor Engagement Labs looked at likes, comments, and clicks to see which brands were the event’s Insta-MVPs and declared Pokémon, Disney’s The Jungle Book,Squarespace, SoFi, and Acura the top five performers. Pokémon asked viewers to call out all the Pokémon references their ad in the Instagram comments, and The Jungle Bookposted a link to the full movie trailer on Instagram right after airing it on TV. (Adweek

Blend is a texting app “built for Gen Z,” with plans to use their popularity on college campuses to grow into competition for WhatsApp and iMessage. The app was created by two college drop-outs who secured $3 million in funding after the release of a controversial promotional video made the app go viral on the former students’ Michigan campus. Their biggest challenge will be retaining Millennials and teens in the crowded messaging space, and Blend is relying on their “snappy design” and focus on photos and video sharing to get them on top.
(San Francisco News

Millennials know you think they’re narcissistic—and they think so too. New research shows Millennials agree that they are more self-involved than older generations: 18-25-year-olds rated themselves a 61.4 (on a 100-point scale) for narcissism, and rated those 60 years or older at 38. However, older respondents “in particular piled on Millennials for their narcissism, while absolving their own age group,” and those 60 and older ranked Millennials as 65.3 on the narcissism scale, and put themselves at 26.5. Unsurprisingly, the study notes that Millennials don’t appreciate constantly being told they’re narcissistic. (Mental Floss

Millennials are looking for something to talk about on social media, and IfOnly is providing the exclusive experiences they can be proud to broadcast. When we first wrote about the site their target users were those with a lot more to spend, but over the past few months they’ve been adding “amazing but highly accessible” offerings—like playing with pandas at a zoo—for a broader audience, priced at $50-$125 per person. IfOnly believes that Millennials on social media will pave the way to their success: “they’re on social media channels, where it’s not fun to post about a belt but it is fun to [post a picture, saying], ‘Check me out backstage.’” (TechCrunch

Quote of the Day: “I am planning to give an iPhone 6s as a gift for this Valentine’s Day.”

—Male, 31, NY

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