Space: The New Millennial Frontier

Hints of Millennials’ fascination with space began a few years ago when galaxy prints started appearing on young tastemakers, and they haven’t gone away since. Amateur “astronauts” began to launch everything from iPhones to Legos into the stratosphere to record a moment in space.  Now, clips of NASA giving lessons on what it’s like to be in orbit are popping up regularly on blogs; and Netflix has made every season of Star Trek available for streaming. Millennials' interest in all things space has solidified.

Today, Ypulse staffer Phil Salvarese takes us through the brands and projects that are making the concept of civilian space travel a reality, and why young consumers are fascinated by the idea.

To Infinity and Beyond!

Well, the Toy Story catch phrase may not be too far from becoming reality. Advances in technology have led to a number of private space programs that are seeking to take customers on a experience that is, literally, out of this world. According to Ypulse’s research, 38% of Millennials ages 14-29 say trying as many new and exciting things as possible is very important to them. Traveling to space certainly falls into that category. Millennials don’t just want to witness history; they want to be a part of it. Having been born well after the moon landing, seeing a bunch of astronauts launch into space may not be a big deal to them, but having the opportunity to go themselves is fascinating. Obviously, most Millennials will never experience these programs, but there is a current fascination with the possibility of civilians in space. Here are a few programs that are pioneering the human leap into the great abyss that are sparking interest among Millennials:

1) AXE Apollo Space Academy

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The Newsfeed

“I’ve been using Apple products for years. Although Samsung technology is probably better, I am so used to Apple that I would probably not switch.”—Female, 18, PA

Major financial institutions are still trying to figure Millennials out, so Prudential conducted a survey to gather some much-needed intel. The Great Recession-era adults are pessimistic about their financial futures: 79% don’t believe that “comfortable retirement” will be a possibility when they’re in their 80s and 70% think “it’s impossible” to save the recommended annual amount to make it possible. Ypulse found that saving for retirement falls behind other, more imminent financial priorities. (MediaPost)

Teens are rallying around the issue of gun control in increasing numbers. A recent survey from Everytown for Gun Safety and Giffords (conducted by Ypulse) found that gun violence prevention is the top issue young people expect the candidate they vote for in 2018 to take a stance on. Six in ten 15-18-year-olds said they’re “’passionate’ about reducing gun violence” and 72% of 15-30-year-olds agreed that politicians who don’t do more to combat gun violence shouldn’t be re-elected. (Mic)

Need proof that the future of STEM is female? Just take a look at children’s drawings. From 1966-1977, researchers asked 5,000 students to draw a scientist, and about 99% of them drew men. Fast forward the same study to 1985-2016, and one-third of children drew a female scientist. But we still have a long way to go to break gender stereotypes: 14-15-year-olds “drew more male than female scientists by an average ratio of 4-to1." (CNN)

Digital consignment store ThredUp wants to open 100 IRL stores. They’re expanding their physical footprint from two to ten stores this year, with more planned for the future. Why are online-only brands increasingly building bricks-and-mortar? (Think: Glossier, Everlane, even ThredUp competitors like The RealReal). Creating experiences with guests from a common check-out up to an in-store event builds “trust” and “awareness.” (Glossy)

Are Instagram and dating apps “crippling” relationships? Psychotherapist Esther Perel thinks so. Ypulse data shows 27% of 18-35-year-olds have used a dating app, 12% use them weekly, and nearly eight in ten use other social media apps weekly or more often. All that time scrolling past potential partners creates a new kind of loneliness: Instead of feeling “socially isolated,” they’re “experiencing a loss of trust and a loss of capital while you are next to the person with whom you’re not supposed to be lonely.” (Recode)

“We should be nice and good to others because we would want the same in return, being rude to someone doesn't make the situation any better.”—Female, 21, MI

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