How Social Media Won The Election

Election night has come and gone, but there’s a still a lot to learn from the race about how Millennials were involved in making it the most social election ever! Besides election night breaking a record with 20 million tweets, young people have taken to the Web the past few months, sharing political memes, gifs, status updates, and more. Most Millennials will tell you that their newsfeeds have been flooded with election information, and their generation has used Facebook as a forum to express their views via status updates and comments. They’ve been much more involved in the election than they’re given credit for, and in surveying 367 Millennials this past weekend, this became especially clear. Most of all, Gen Y made their interactions around the election social, engaging their peers in political information in accessible and often entertaining ways.

We asked Millennials about their political habits on social media leading up to the election and found that they were most active on Facebook. One-third (35%) said they posted a Facebook status about the election in the past two months and 4 in 10 (41%) commented on someone’s Facebook status about the election. Moreover, a quarter (24%) tweeted about the election and a close percentage (26%) replied to or retweeted someone else’s tweet about the election. Obviously these numbers jumped dramatically on Election Day with nearly 30% of Millennials informing their network who they voted for and millions sharing their thoughts on the outcome. Apparently taking pictures of, or Instagramming your ballot, is illegal in some states, but this idea itself reflects a very Millennial mindset of wanting to document their experiences and excitement about the election across social media.

Moreover, much of the political information among peers has…

 
 

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“I eat [Pizza Hut] least two times per month; it's one of my favorite places to go to eat pizza.”—Male, 35, VA

More Millennials are asking for cash wedding registries, and it’s bad news for stores like Bed Bath & Beyond and Williams Sonoma. Increasingly, young couples are asking guests to contribute towards their nest egg, travel, or anything they feel like buying themselves. Companies like Zola and Honeypot have boomed in popularity, offering a personalized platform for their cash registries. However, their success with wedding registries is taking “a key customer acquisition tool” away from home décor stores. (Insider)

The beauty industry is catering to Customization Nation, as more companies crop up to blend unique beauty products for each customer. But can the trend scale? Truly personalized products, like the ones offered by hair care start-up Function of Beauty and makeup company Bite Beauty, take time and resources. But companies that offer base products with just a personalized element or two could be the future of the industry. And big-name brands are getting their feet wet too: Lancôme and CoverGirl have both offered custom-made foundations. (Glossy)

Nordstrom is taking risks to survive retail’s big shifts. Instead of shuttering stores, they’re opening experimental retail locations, revamping their department stores, and making their mark in Manhattan with their first store openings. The long-standing brand also bought ecommerce site HauteLook and the subscription service Trunk Club. So far, their risk-taking hasn’t proved to be a boon to their bottom line—but only time will tell. (WSJ)

Hollister is teaming up with AwesomenessTV to reach Gen Z with a YouTube series. “The Carpe Life” will be a part of a broader campaign, which includes influencer marketingand appeals to young consumers’ love for active, adventurous lifestyles. "The Carpe Life" follows Hollister's first YouTube series, “This is Summer” which “boosted key brand metrics by double digits,” adding on to their overall positive impact on Abercrombie & Fitch’s rising bottom line. (Marketing Dive)

Netflix is switching its strategy, putting less money into “prestige films” for the Post-TV Gen. Instead, they’re churning out more direct-to-video releases. Last year, they bought ten titles at Sundance while this year they had none. While they continue to create original content like the recent The Cloverfield Paradox, they’re betting on less-than-award-worthy films to maintain their hold on Millennial viewers. (The Atlantic)

“Basically if I found out any brand was supporting causes I do not support and actively oppose, I will avoid buying their products.”—Female, 27, CA

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