Relationships Then And Now: Changes In Social Values Change The Dating Scene

Today we wrap up our Youth Advisory Board series on relationships and romance. Christopher Walcott shares his perspective on how dating has progressed from the time when his parents dated to now — and it’s not all sunshine and roses. He feels that sincerity and romance are absent. In fact, he prefers the old ways of courting that are more in line with his values. For another take on modern dating and relationships, check out Caroline’s opinion of “textmance.”

If you’d like to contact the Ypulse Youth Advisory Board, send an email to youthadvisoryboard @ ypulse.com or leave a comment below.

Then Vs. Now…

retro weddingMy mom and I were talking the other day about the differences between relationships now, compared to when she grew up. Traditional means of dating appeared very technical back then. Before a young man could date a young lady, he would have to go through “the procedures.” Conversation between couples didn’t rely on Internet capabilities — interpersonal relationships stemmed from face-to-face interactions, which were limited to either school or a visit at home. And to see the object of his affection at home meant the young man had to prove himself before entering her house. I chuckled a bit when I heard that one. These days, a young man doesn’t have to go through the long tension of the girl’s father’s eyes piercing into his soul trying to find the slightest fault in him — not to mention the thousand questions he’d ask:
Where are you from?
What are you planning to be?
Have you ever been to jail?

The list can go on and on…

Parents aren’t included as much as before — dating now is more autonomous, independent, and liberated. So while parents may disagree with your choice of partner, it won’t necessarily bring an end to the relationship. Some parents get more involved than…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

“The issue I am most passionate about is jobs/unemployment, because I need a job.”

—Female, 24, OH

Half of all 13-17-year-olds are on Snapchat, according to Ypulse’s most recent social media tracker—so what are they really doing on there? One BuzzFeed writer observed his 13-year-old sister to find out how to “Snapchat like the teens,” and learned that the “app is [her] life.” She wakes up every morning to respond to about 40 incoming snaps with selfies, which she can do in under a minute. Responding is crucial, streaks (responding every day without a break) are “the MOST important thing,” filters are “VERY big,” and “EVERYONE looks at Cosmo on Discover.” When asked about her dad’s reaction to her incessant snapping she answered: “Parents don’t understand. It’s about being there in the moment.” (BuzzFeed

The Tab, a student-targeted site with articles on campus life and local stories, is not ready to let go of their 2.5 million monthly readers preparing to graduate—so they’ve expanded. The Tab National is targeting for 20-somethings, and describes itself as as “the Vice for people who don’t think that Uber or pop-up markets are necessarily a bad thing.” The Tab’s top-tier U.S. and U.K. university sites have captivated advertisers, who are guaranteed that their sponsored posts will get at least 25,000 page views—more than half of brand stories on the site are getting 50,000. (Digiday

You may have heard that Twitter is reworking their timeline algorithm, but what does that mean for brands? The new layout will use an algorithm to showcase the most relevant tweets, and “collated tweets from brands, athletes, politicians and other public figures will appear at the top of the timeline” so users won’t miss any trending conversations. For brands this means well-thought out content will still be key as “[t]he algorithm will likely favor content with higher engagement.” It could also mean more exposure: “organic posts [will] have the ability to drive enormous engagement and cause a buzz.” (The Drum

According to Pew’s new data, Millennial Democrats are far more likely than older generations and their Republican peers to get their political updates through social media, with 74% who are very likely going to participate in their state’s primary or caucus saying they learned about the election through a social site, compared to 50% of Millennial Republicans. Millennial Democrats are also the most likely to identify themselves as liberal: in 2015, half (49%) labeled themselves as liberals, compared to 41% of Gen X, 40%(of Boomer, and 35% of Silent Democrats. (Pew Research Center)

Luxury menswear brand John Varavatos’s shoppable, touchable video ad powered by Cinematique prompted eight times more Facebook engagement than standard videos. Viewers can click or tap clothing like as the video plays, and at the end of the ad are shown the collection they chose, leading to product pages on the website. According to recent data, 33% of fashion video are considered mainly “brand-building,” and only 16% of brands use shoppable videos. But that could shift as more marketers adjust to consumers’ video-consumption behaviors. (WWDDigiday)

Quote of the Day: “I participated in Bikram Yoga, because I found a few YouTube tutorials on it.” –Female, 24, MN

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