Relationships Then And Now: Changes In Social Values Change The Dating Scene

Today we wrap up our Youth Advisory Board series on relationships and romance. Christopher Walcott shares his perspective on how dating has progressed from the time when his parents dated to now — and it’s not all sunshine and roses. He feels that sincerity and romance are absent. In fact, he prefers the old ways of courting that are more in line with his values. For another take on modern dating and relationships, check out Caroline’s opinion of “textmance.”

If you’d like to contact the Ypulse Youth Advisory Board, send an email to youthadvisoryboard @ or leave a comment below.

Then Vs. Now…

retro weddingMy mom and I were talking the other day about the differences between relationships now, compared to when she grew up. Traditional means of dating appeared very technical back then. Before a young man could date a young lady, he would have to go through “the procedures.” Conversation between couples didn’t rely on Internet capabilities — interpersonal relationships stemmed from face-to-face interactions, which were limited to either school or a visit at home. And to see the object of his affection at home meant the young man had to prove himself before entering her house. I chuckled a bit when I heard that one. These days, a young man doesn’t have to go through the long tension of the girl’s father’s eyes piercing into his soul trying to find the slightest fault in him — not to mention the thousand questions he’d ask:
Where are you from?
What are you planning to be?
Have you ever been to jail?

The list can go on and on…

Parents aren’t included as much as before — dating now is more autonomous, independent, and liberated. So while parents may disagree with your choice of partner, it won’t necessarily bring an end to the relationship. Some parents get more involved than…


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The Newsfeed

"I play [games] constantly until 4 in the morning. When I’m not on my game I’m checking my phone. And the whole time I’m doing all of that my desktop is on the internet.”—Male, 22, OH

Twitch is airing every episode of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, in celebration of the late Fred Rogers’ 90th birthday and the show’s 50th anniversary. The esports streaming service is expanding to nostalgia entertainment (which young viewers can’t get enough of), but they have a unique twist. The show will be available for co-viewing, with popular Twitch streamers chiming in from time to time. (Mashable)

Over one-third of 18-34-year-olds have stopped using a brand after hearing negative news about them, more than any other generation. Among the brands that most consumers said they gave up on were Wells Fargo, Target, Papa John’s, and Uber. However, Critical Mix and kNOW also found that young consumers are more willing to forgive a brand for bad press: While only 30% of consumers overall would use a brand again after a scandal, 41% of 25-34-year-olds would. (MediaPost)

Alamo Drafthouse is bringing back VHS—offering free rentals for Millennials that wax nostalgic for analog products. Their first store, Video Vortex, is opening in North Carolina. Not only are they “fostering a movie-loving community” with the extensive gratis collection of 75,000 titles, but they’re making money off of the added “beer, food, and merchandise.” No VHS player? No problem. They’re renting those as well. (BoingBoingEW)

Researchers were surprised to find Gen Z students were “relieved” to ditch their smartphones for a few weeks. Screen Education’s study of 62 12-16-year-olds found that 92% thought “it was beneficial” to disconnect from their smartphones while they were at camp. And even though 41% admitted they felt frustrated at times, 35% were able to cut down their use after camp and 17% convinced a friend to curb their time spent on smartphones, too. (PR Newswire)

Beauty brands love augmented reality, but an app can’t replace in-store experience. Not only did Ypulse found time and again that young consumers expect Experiencification and flock to marketing activations (like pop-ups), but brick-and-mortar locations build loyalty. People think they’re scamming Sephora when they re-do their makeup gratis, but that time-spent-in-store is really “turning the ‘scammers’ into buyers.” (Quartzy)

"I love my smart phone. It is just like my best friend [and] I just can't do without my smartphone...”—Male, 27, CA

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