Relationships Then And Now: Changes In Social Values Change The Dating Scene

Today we wrap up our Youth Advisory Board series on relationships and romance. Christopher Walcott shares his perspective on how dating has progressed from the time when his parents dated to now — and it’s not all sunshine and roses. He feels that sincerity and romance are absent. In fact, he prefers the old ways of courting that are more in line with his values. For another take on modern dating and relationships, check out Caroline’s opinion of “textmance.”

If you’d like to contact the Ypulse Youth Advisory Board, send an email to youthadvisoryboard @ or leave a comment below.

Then Vs. Now…

retro weddingMy mom and I were talking the other day about the differences between relationships now, compared to when she grew up. Traditional means of dating appeared very technical back then. Before a young man could date a young lady, he would have to go through “the procedures.” Conversation between couples didn’t rely on Internet capabilities — interpersonal relationships stemmed from face-to-face interactions, which were limited to either school or a visit at home. And to see the object of his affection at home meant the young man had to prove himself before entering her house. I chuckled a bit when I heard that one. These days, a young man doesn’t have to go through the long tension of the girl’s father’s eyes piercing into his soul trying to find the slightest fault in him — not to mention the thousand questions he’d ask:
Where are you from?
What are you planning to be?
Have you ever been to jail?

The list can go on and on…

Parents aren’t included as much as before — dating now is more autonomous, independent, and liberated. So while parents may disagree with your choice of partner, it won’t necessarily bring an end to the relationship. Some parents get more involved than…


Want to talk to us about the article
or dive into a custom study?

Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “It wouldn’t be Thanksgiving without my cousins' annoying kids running in front of the TV.” –Male, 30, MA

Watch your back Instagram. Flipagram’s rise, and its partnership with music labels, could make it the next big sharing platform to watch. The app reached 30 million monthly users after one year, hitting the milestone faster than Facebook and Snapchat before it. Because music can be added to the 30-second photo videos users make, it has set itself apart from competitors Vine and Instagram, and the number of flips made on the platform rose 165% in the last year. (Forbes)

The final film of The Hunger Games franchise is in theatres, ending a wildly successful run at the box office. The movies weren’t considered a sure thing, but became a “runaway smash” because they perfectly matched Millennials’ mindset, becoming “an all-purpose metaphor for life as a young person in the post-recession era.” The theory is that because books debuted just as the recession was beginning, the dark tone and cutthroat storyline aligned with their experiences. (We happen to agree.) (Vox

Millennials continue to think more positively about technology than other generations. According to a 2015 poll, Millennials are more likely than Xers and Boomers to think tech helps them to learn new skills, has a positive impact on their relationships with friends, and allows them to live life the way they want. More than half of Millennials believe that technology positively effects their happiness, compared to 42% of Xers, and 30% of Boomers. (MediaPost)

Millennials might be less traditionally religious than older generations, but they are just as spiritual. While fewer Millennials say religion is very important, attend weekly religious services, or pray every day than Xers, Boomers, and Silents, they are equally likely to think about the meaning and purpose of life, and feel a sense of gratitude or thankfulness each week. (Pew Research)

Advertisements on YouTube Kids are getting the app into some trouble. Ads for junk food regularly appear on the platform “in the form of funny contests and animated stories,” and two complaints have been filed calling for an investigation of food marketers, videos programmers, and Google. The complaints argue that food companies have not lived up to their promises to keep junk food marketing off the app. (NYTimes)

Quote of the Day: "It wouldn’t be Thanksgiving without my brother suggesting we don't celebrate and just order pizza.” -Male, 15, GA

Sign Up Now

Subscribe for premium access to our content, data, and tools.

Already a subscriber? Sign in.

Upgrade Now

Upgrade for full access to the best marketing tools for understanding the next generation.

View our Client Case Studies