Redefining “Social” As Millennials Switch Mediums 27 Times An Hour

Today’s post comes to us from Matt, a Youth Advisory Board member who, like many Millennials, notices how often his generation switches from one medium to another in search of new entertainment and information. This frequent shift of attention among technologies — which occurs 27 times an hour! — has inevitably impacted social situations and how Gen Yers interact with each other. Yet, it's also created a new definition of "social" as Matt explains weighing in on the pros and cons of having tons of technology at our fingertips. This desire to multitask and move between mediums creates a challenge for marketers as they have to work harder to capture Millennials' attention, but they can do so by providing ads that are entertaining and worthwhile for the consumer...

To contact members of the Youth Advisory Board, you can email them at youthadvisoryboard @ ypulse.com or simply leave a message in the comments.

Redefining "Social" As Millennials Switch Mediums 27 Times An Hour

Switching Devices FrequentlyThere were many lazy afternoons this past semester when I would be sitting in my living room with a couple of friends. The sun was pouring through our sliding glass door, the television was on, and music was blaring from my roommates’ bedroom. Meanwhile, each person was glued to their smartphone playing Words With Friends or another interactive game with someone who wasn’t even in the room.

I remember looking around the room and thinking that this completely sums up how technology has changed how Millennials interact. We have so many choices to be entertained and informed that it’s so easy to neglect what’s right in front of us, often the people we’re with.

But that’s not to say that technology has made us less social. It may, in fact, be the opposite; we can stay connected to more people than ever through…

 
 

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Quote of the Day: “I get spending money from helping my neighbors with their computer problems.”—Male, 14, FL

Although controversial to some, influencer marketing isn’t going away any time soon. A new survey by influencer platform Linqia revealed that 94% of marketers across many industries believe influencer marketing to be effective, despite 78% saying that determining the ROI of the approach will be one of the top challenges of 2017. The top benefits cited were creating authentic content (87%), driving engagement (77%), and driving traffic to website (56%). (Adweek)

Vine stars are finding a new home on live stream app Live.ly. The app, a spin-off from the popular video network Musical.ly, generated half a million downloads in its first week by creating a platform where broadcasters can engage with viewers and stream as long as they like—and then there’s the money. According to Musical.ly, the top 10 broadcasters on the platform have made an average of $46,000 in the span of two weeks with a monetization model that lets users make contributions during streams. (Business Insider)

Self magazine is leaving print behind, and going all-digital. The publication has announced that February’s issue will be their last print production, and their new strategy will make them “uniquely positioned to give consumers more of what they love while creating innovative and engaging opportunities for our advertising partners.” The all-digital tactic is a first for a major Condé Nast magazine, and reflects the decreasing interest in print in the digital media era. (The Wall Street Journal)

Teens and kids are embracing tech even more than Millennials. A new Quizlet survey found that U.S. students 16-years-old and younger are 28% more likely than Millennials to say that technology helps them learn faster than traditional tools like worksheets and lectures. Their teachers were even more open to tech: they were 32% more likely than students to say learning tech is good use of classroom time, and 20% more likely to say devices make learning fun. (CNET)

Retirement may be on the outs. According to a Merrill Edge survey, 83% of “mass affluent” 18-34-year-olds say they will still work after they “retire,” “either for income, to keep busy, or to pursue a passion.” Getting to retirement will be a struggle in itself: Half of 18-24-year-olds and 24% of 24-34-year-olds say they will need a side job to reach their retirement savings goal, which three in four believe will be $1 million. (CNNMoney

Quote of the Day: “My favorite thing to do to have fun is stay at home and invite friends over.”—Male, 32, VA

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