Recent Lessons In Marketing to Millennials

Here at Ypulse, we understand the complexities of marketing to Millennials, and are constantly on the lookout for brands who are getting it right. Here are some recent lessons in marketing to Millennials from campaigns that both resonated and fell flat with the generation.  

 

 

 

 

 

1. Bloomberg Businessweek “Gets You Ahead”

Businessweek pokes fun at Millennials living with their parents.

Recently Bloomberg Businessweek embarked on a campaign to get younger subscribers by targeting the almost 23 million 18-34-year-olds living at home with their parents, and encouraging those parents to tell them to get the hell out. Siblings, significant others, friends and other relatives are also invited to participate in the campaign to shame childhood home-dwelling Gen Ys. One of the “colorful” ecards available to send contains the message, “You’re a drain on this economy, sweetie pie.” Another tells the young recipient, “We’re not ashamed of you, but we’re getting there.” The problem with the campaign is twofold. First, it plays on a stereotype of Millennials as lazy and free-riding without considering the reality that they are struggling to find jobs and might just be working hard to try to work towards standing on their own two feet. We often tell brands that they need to understand how Millennials see themselves in order to speak to them authentically. They do not see themselves as “house barnacles” when they are sending out resumes by the hundred, and impending student loan payments are keeping them up at night. The second misstep here is the assumption that Millennials’ parents resent their presence. As our own Jake Katz told Adweek, “Where they missed the mark is pitching it as, you guys are annoying mom and dad by being at home. That's not the case. Mom and dad are not…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the day: “I learned to cook with ship-to-home meals like Blue Apron.” –Male, 24, IL

Lego has an imaginary friend that they want you to meet. The brand's latest video campaign, created in partnership with Facebook, asks kids around the world to define and build a “kronkiwongi,” whatever they imagine it might be. The clips celebrate kids’ imaginations and creativity, and the brand is hoping to engage and inspire parents with the content. Participants are encouraged to upload videos of their own kids’ kronkiwongi creations, which will be compiled into a final video showcasing all the submissions. (Campaign Live)

YouTube’s #humblebrag last week was well deserved, as the site comes in at number one for U.S. tweens and teens. According to a survey by KidSay, 89% of 8-15-year-olds use YouTube, and 44% subscribe to between one and 10 channels, while 35% subscribe to more than 21 channels. 29% of tweens and teens say watching videos is what they do most while online, with boys gravitating towards game-related channels and girls watching more DIY, life-style centric channels. According to Ypulse’s social media tracker, 79% of 13-32-year-olds currently say they have a YouTube account. (Kidscreen)

Ever wonder why music taste varies by generation? According to a study by Spotify and Echo Nest data, taste in music is solidified around 33-years-old, after which it becomes more rare to seek out new music. This “taste freeze,” when music preferences are locked in, happens when listeners stop listening to what’s considered popular music, and instead return to “the music that was popular when they were coming of age.” The study illustrates that listeners’ interest in new music continues until around 25, then slows to “maturity” in the mid-30s. (Uproxx)

BMW wants to make Drivers Ed cool. The luxury car brand is offering teens in several major U.S. cities a free, two-hour driving class that teaches “safety and fun” and also puts participants behind the wheels of several BMW models. The free class is a shortened version of their two day, $1,295 hands-on course that lets kids learn about everything from hand placement to high-speed breaking, and take the Beemers out for a spin on a road course to improve their skills, and presumably become more attached to the brand. (Time)

Last week anonymous group Never 21 took over Millennial-favorite brand Forever 21’s flagship store in New York City to spread awareness of the young people of color who were never able to reach age 21 due to police violence. The group hung a #BlackLivesMatter banner in the window and dressed the mannequins in “Black Lives Matter” T-shirts. We’re continuing to see Millennials step forward and become a part of social activism movements around the world. (Refinery29)

Let’s face it—we are living in the age of the selfie. It’s a legitimate Webster term, the new autograph, a way to say hi, and we’ve taken a closer look at the current status of young consumers and the selfie for you. Check out our most recentInfographic Snapshot, which breaks down complex data into an easy to understand and quick to digest visual takeaway. Our Gold and Silver subscribers are given access to our regularly published informative Infographic Snapshots that take our proprietary monthly survey stats and synthesize them to tell a story about this generation’s behaviors and views. (Ypulse)

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