Reassessing Millennials at the Ypulse Mashup

An announcement from Ypulse President Dan Coates:

Last month Ypulse celebrated our ninth birthday. For the past nine years, we've been thinking about, talking about, writing about and researching members of the Millennial generation or, as we used to say much more often than we do nowadays, Gen Y. As we look back, it's gratifying to see how what was once a niche topic that required a great deal of effort in order to attract attention has since become central to the marketing plans of so many marketers and communicators.

During the course of the nine-year dialogue, Millennials themselves have changed. They've "aged up," with the midpoint of the generation now 20 years of age. They've faced the greatest economic downturn since the Great Depression. They've watched their parents struggle to support them and their families. A conversation that was once adolescent and teen-centric has developed a number of new facets as Millennials catapult toward adulthood: politics, education, economy, career and, most recently, parenthood. These emerging frontiers of the Millennial experience are new, exciting and challenging. While we feel that we've developed a pretty solid understanding of the fundamental values of the largest generation in American history, it's both energizing and rewarding to see how our understanding is pressure tested daily as Millennials evolve. 

While Jake Katz has already written about our plans to name the generation that will follow the Millennials, we're really excited to follow that conversation with one that will shed new light on Millennials themselves. At our Ypulse Mashup: Millennials Reassessed event on June 27th, we'll reveal the details of a massive psychographic segmentation that we've undertaken that will break up this monolithic generation into smaller…


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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “My financial priority is getting a job and getting out of my parents’ house.” –Male, 20, WA

Virtual reality is poised to become an entertainment game-changer—could it revolutionize education as well? Google is pioneering Expeditions, a new “virtual field trip” program that reaches out to schools with lessons that integrate virtual reality viewers. Expensive VR headsets are not necessary since Google Cardboard is used, allowing a very new technology to be brought into classrooms at an early stage. (NYTimes)

Millennials are bringing their financial preferences to wedding planning. A survey from The Knot and PayPal found that 44% of couples wish they could make all their vendor payments via smartphone, and 42% were surprised their vendors did not accept electronic payments. They also want the “I do” day to be money-hassle-free: 70% think automated payments for remaining balances on the wedding day would be helpful. (MarketWatch)

Smartphones present a whole new set of social problems for Millennials—especially when they’re using them while drinking. New app Drunk Mode, targeting college kids, is designed to make phones safe to use while under the influence: select contacts are hidden for 12 hours to prevent dangerous drunk dialing, the “Find My Drunk” feature uses GPS to help users find drunk friends, and there are also tools for hailing safe rides and retracing intoxicated footsteps. (Springwise)

After years of magical, mystical creatures and dystopian horror stories ruling YA shelves, a new wave of novels are making more relatable narratives popular again. According to Scholastic, “realism is on the rise,” and books that feature the problems of real-world teens are the next big thing. Recent examples include 21 PromsHomeroom Diaries, and Me and Earl and the Dying Girl, which was also turned into a feature film. (Scholastic)

In 2014, designer Rebecca Minkoff opened her stores of the future, featuring digital fitting rooms with large, mirrored touch screen walls that allow visitors to browse the latest collections, runway shows, photos, and other brand content . Almost a year later, those tech dressing rooms are being credited with tripling expected clothing sales. Minkoff says, “Trying something on signifies intent, and the customer may not have been thinking about buying a dress, but they see it suggested on the screen and know to ask for it.” (Digiday)

Quote of the Day: “My biggest financial goal is Financial independence from my parents.” –Female, 22, MA

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