Reassessing Millennials at the Ypulse Mashup

An announcement from Ypulse President Dan Coates:

Last month Ypulse celebrated our ninth birthday. For the past nine years, we've been thinking about, talking about, writing about and researching members of the Millennial generation or, as we used to say much more often than we do nowadays, Gen Y. As we look back, it's gratifying to see how what was once a niche topic that required a great deal of effort in order to attract attention has since become central to the marketing plans of so many marketers and communicators.

During the course of the nine-year dialogue, Millennials themselves have changed. They've "aged up," with the midpoint of the generation now 20 years of age. They've faced the greatest economic downturn since the Great Depression. They've watched their parents struggle to support them and their families. A conversation that was once adolescent and teen-centric has developed a number of new facets as Millennials catapult toward adulthood: politics, education, economy, career and, most recently, parenthood. These emerging frontiers of the Millennial experience are new, exciting and challenging. While we feel that we've developed a pretty solid understanding of the fundamental values of the largest generation in American history, it's both energizing and rewarding to see how our understanding is pressure tested daily as Millennials evolve. 

While Jake Katz has already written about our plans to name the generation that will follow the Millennials, we're really excited to follow that conversation with one that will shed new light on Millennials themselves. At our Ypulse Mashup: Millennials Reassessed event on June 27th, we'll reveal the details of a massive psychographic segmentation that we've undertaken that will break up this monolithic generation into smaller…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: 

Q: What goals do you have for yourself that your parents did not have? 

A: “Working for myself, finding a career field that fits with both my interests and skills, being in a relationship(s?) that is healthy and promotes growth (not necessarily marriage)…” –Male, 23, D.C.

Summer isn’t over yet, but there is already a prediction for what will be THE toy of the holiday season. The BB-8 droid, viral star of the Star Wars: The Force Awakens trailer, has been made into a real, working remote-control toy “every Star Wars fan has dreamed of owning.” The BB-8 droid can be controlled via smartphone app and with verbal commands, and operates like a remote control car—with the added magic of a robot head staying balanced on top of it. (WSJ)

“Give me my mobile TV!” According to Ericsson’s new media report, more than half of Millennials’ entertainment viewing time (53%) is spent on smartphones, tablets, and laptops. The numbers are even more dramatic among teens, who are watching nearly 75% of their TV and videos on mobile. Unsurprisingly, younger viewers are also watching linear TV less than older audiences, with 60% of 16-34-year-olds watching everyday, compared to 82% of 60-69-year-olds. (The Verge)

Major entertainment brands and TV networks are teaming up to solve the problem of the “growing legion of missing kids.” (See above.) The recently formed Coalition for Innovative Media Measurement is backed by Time Warner, Disney, NBCU, and many others, and is studying the viewing behavior of 2-17-year-olds to create a new measurement system that could account for all of the ways that they consume video—outside of “’old-school’ TV.” (Variety)

The teen years used to be all about fitting in, but for today’s middle and high schoolers, standing out is so much cooler than being like everyone else. Ypulse’s own Chief Content Officer MaryLeigh Bliss weighed in with a little why behind the what: “Teenagers have grown up learning innately about personal branding in order to stand out in a sea of billions of people. If you want followers and likes, you have to display photos and videos that show you doing and wearing interesting things. Otherwise you’re going to fade into the background.” (The Globe and Mail)

Children’s nonfiction is having a moment. Nonfiction children’s book sales have reportedly spiked, going up 38% in the last year for Penguin Young Readers Group. At Scholastic, Minecraft handbooks have in-print figures over 17.5 million, and non-fiction annuals like Scholastic Year in Sports have become so popular they are expanding the series with a gaming edition. (Publishers Weekly)

Quote of the Day: “My aspiration is to retire early and travel!” –Male, 27, CA

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