Questions With A 17-Year-Old: Julia Tanenbaum

In today's edition of "Questions With a Millennial," we chatted with 17-year-old high school junior Julia Tanenbaum about social media, news consumption, habits among her generation, and more.

Questions With a MillennialWhat are 5 things you couldn't live without?
1. My cellphone
2. Books
3. My computer
4. The Internet
5. My dog

How do you typically watch TV? On a set or streaming? Alone or with family or friends?
I usually don't watch TV on an actual television. I watch it online on sites like Hulu, or I download it and then watch it on my computer. I usually watch it alone, not with my family.

What's your preferred social network and why?
I usually use Facebook because I like how everyone else is on it. I mostly use it for chatting with people, but I also get a lot of my news from it. However, I really hate how ads for things are showing up in your newsfeed. I don't care about or want to see a brand's newest status. Julia Full Photo

About how often do you check your cellphone?
I check it every couple minutes if possible. Sometimes I have it off because I forgot to charge it.

What's the last thing you watched on YouTube?
I think it was a video of my favorite band, the Mountain Goats, performing live.

How do you typically get news, if at all?
I read the news online. I like my news independent, so I usually read progressive sites like Common Dreams or Alternet. I also like a lot of Occupy and other social movement related pages on Facebook and those are another way I get my news.

What brand do you think really understands your generation and why?
I really like Lush cosmetics because all their products are organic, most are vegan, and I know they treat their workers ethically. These are things I, as a socially responsible consumer, care deeply about, and I try not to support brands like Urban…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I follow the news because it’s there and I can't avoid it.”—Female, 28, ME

Nike has taken the gold in Olympic ad engagement with a focus on authenticity. The brand’s 2016 Rio Olympic Games campaign “stepped beyond” “Just Do It” with a series of spots showing average people pushing themselves beyond their limits. The response to the approach has been overwhelmingly positive–viewers of one ad featuring a mountain climber born without arms and legs called it their “new favorite Nike video.” The campaign exceeded “any other brand in engagement rates,” earning 6.7 million shares and 6.5 million likes and favorites since March. (MediaPost

Facebook is taking a new swipe at Snapchat with a new camera-first app for teens only. Lifestage, created by a 19-year-old former Facebook intern, reimagines the original Facebook experience for teens today with profile pages filled with video clips and filters. Currently, the app’s network is limited to high school and undergrad students—users over the age of 21 can only see their own profiles. However, teens can see the profiles of all other users, “inside and outside” their schools, which could make privacy a concern. Facebook’s previous standalone apps have not found much success, leading the site to shut down their Creative Labs division last year. (The Daily Dot,BuzzFeed)

Unable to compete with social media, The New York Times is putting an end to its Millennial news app. NYT Now was launched in 2014 in an effort to lure in young readers with conversational content at a discounted price. After failing to attract new users, the app dropped its paywall for a freemium model that let users read up to 10 free articles a month. The updated strategy still did little to bring in a younger audience, averaging 257,000 unique users in the past three months. (Business Insider

College students are increasingly taking their athletic talents off the field. At many colleges, you don’t need to play traditional sports like football, track, or lacrosse to be a star athlete—instead, students are opting for sports that require “little prerequisite talent and less on-field aggression,” like ultimate Frisbee, rock climbing, fishing, and wood-chopping tournaments. Many of these alt-sport players discover the new competitive activities because they don’t fit the strict requirements to join other sports teams, and say inclusive team spirit and lack of competitive strife between opponents are major draws. (The Wall Street Journal

Most beauty brands are trying to draw in younger consumers, and Estée Lauder has strategic plans to keep Millennials happy. The brand’s recent profit boost was mostly generated by “color cosmetics brands like Estée Lauder, SmashboxMAC and Clinique,” but prestige fragrance and skin care continue to suffer. They plan to revive the segment by focusing on “selfie culture,” and count on the social media strategy that has fueled their makeup success to work on “instant-gratification” products like face masks and moisturizers. Partnerships with digital influencers, including those with lower but highly engaged followings, are also in the plans. (Fashionista)

Quote of the Day: “I like yoga because It can be used for the body, mind, breath, and soul if desired. I can do it alone or with other people. It can also be as short or long as I want.”—Female, 27, AR

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