Questions With A 17-Year-Old: Julia Tanenbaum

In today's edition of "Questions With a Millennial," we chatted with 17-year-old high school junior Julia Tanenbaum about social media, news consumption, habits among her generation, and more.

Questions With a MillennialWhat are 5 things you couldn't live without?
1. My cellphone
2. Books
3. My computer
4. The Internet
5. My dog

How do you typically watch TV? On a set or streaming? Alone or with family or friends?
I usually don't watch TV on an actual television. I watch it online on sites like Hulu, or I download it and then watch it on my computer. I usually watch it alone, not with my family.

What's your preferred social network and why?
I usually use Facebook because I like how everyone else is on it. I mostly use it for chatting with people, but I also get a lot of my news from it. However, I really hate how ads for things are showing up in your newsfeed. I don't care about or want to see a brand's newest status. Julia Full Photo

About how often do you check your cellphone?
I check it every couple minutes if possible. Sometimes I have it off because I forgot to charge it.

What's the last thing you watched on YouTube?
I think it was a video of my favorite band, the Mountain Goats, performing live.

How do you typically get news, if at all?
I read the news online. I like my news independent, so I usually read progressive sites like Common Dreams or Alternet. I also like a lot of Occupy and other social movement related pages on Facebook and those are another way I get my news.

What brand do you think really understands your generation and why?
I really like Lush cosmetics because all their products are organic, most are vegan, and I know they treat their workers ethically. These are things I, as a socially responsible consumer, care deeply about, and I try not to support brands like Urban…

 
 

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The Newsfeed

Quote of the Day: “I get spending money from helping my neighbors with their computer problems.”—Male, 14, FL

Although controversial to some, influencer marketing isn’t going away any time soon. A new survey by influencer platform Linqia revealed that 94% of marketers across many industries believe influencer marketing to be effective, despite 78% saying that determining the ROI of the approach will be one of the top challenges of 2017. The top benefits cited were creating authentic content (87%), driving engagement (77%), and driving traffic to website (56%). (Adweek)

Vine stars are finding a new home on live stream app Live.ly. The app, a spin-off from the popular video network Musical.ly, generated half a million downloads in its first week by creating a platform where broadcasters can engage with viewers and stream as long as they like—and then there’s the money. According to Musical.ly, the top 10 broadcasters on the platform have made an average of $46,000 in the span of two weeks with a monetization model that lets users make contributions during streams. (Business Insider)

Self magazine is leaving print behind, and going all-digital. The publication has announced that February’s issue will be their last print production, and their new strategy will make them “uniquely positioned to give consumers more of what they love while creating innovative and engaging opportunities for our advertising partners.” The all-digital tactic is a first for a major Condé Nast magazine, and reflects the decreasing interest in print in the digital media era. (The Wall Street Journal)

Teens and kids are embracing tech even more than Millennials. A new Quizlet survey found that U.S. students 16-years-old and younger are 28% more likely than Millennials to say that technology helps them learn faster than traditional tools like worksheets and lectures. Their teachers were even more open to tech: they were 32% more likely than students to say learning tech is good use of classroom time, and 20% more likely to say devices make learning fun. (CNET)

Retirement may be on the outs. According to a Merrill Edge survey, 83% of “mass affluent” 18-34-year-olds say they will still work after they “retire,” “either for income, to keep busy, or to pursue a passion.” Getting to retirement will be a struggle in itself: Half of 18-24-year-olds and 24% of 24-34-year-olds say they will need a side job to reach their retirement savings goal, which three in four believe will be $1 million. (CNNMoney

Quote of the Day: “My favorite thing to do to have fun is stay at home and invite friends over.”—Male, 32, VA

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