Q&A With Tiffany Alvord: YouTube Star

YouTube has launched careers for tons of artists today and has a created a culture of loyal fans who subscribe to singers' channels, follow them on social media, and help them rise to fame. That's the story of 19-year-old singer-songwriter turned YouTube sensation Tiffany Alvord, who's among the top talent in this space. Tiffany started posting videos to the site for fun, but has since become a star with more than 900,000 subscribers, a worldwide following, several albums, and she'll soon have her own show following her success on Awesomeness TV, a popular YouTube channel among tweens and teens.

We chatted with Tiffany about how the Internet propelled her singing career, the YouTube community, and how social media enables musicians to form an authentic connection with fans, offering new opportunities for artists today...

Tiffany Alvord 2 Ypulse: How did you get started in the music business?

Tiffany Alvord: I have always enjoyed singing and performing. I took piano lessons when I was in elementary school and when I was about 10, I began writing songs with my friend at recess. We would perform our songs for our friends in a mini-concert on the playground on Fridays. When my friends came to my house, we would write songs and design CD covers. When I was in junior high school, I got a pink Daisy Rock guitar for Christmas and taught myself how to play it.

Much of my focus was on gymnastics when I was younger and I reached competition levels in junior high. However, I injured myself and had to quit and decided to focus on acting and singing.

YP: What made you decide to create a YouTube channel and did you have any expectation of getting a following or being discovered?

TA: I discovered YouTube when I was 15-years-old. I saw another girl my age who had posted cover songs and had an original song…

 
 

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