Q&A With Tiffany Alvord: YouTube Star

YouTube has launched careers for tons of artists today and has a created a culture of loyal fans who subscribe to singers' channels, follow them on social media, and help them rise to fame. That's the story of 19-year-old singer-songwriter turned YouTube sensation Tiffany Alvord, who's among the top talent in this space. Tiffany started posting videos to the site for fun, but has since become a star with more than 900,000 subscribers, a worldwide following, several albums, and she'll soon have her own show following her success on Awesomeness TV, a popular YouTube channel among tweens and teens.

We chatted with Tiffany about how the Internet propelled her singing career, the YouTube community, and how social media enables musicians to form an authentic connection with fans, offering new opportunities for artists today...

Tiffany Alvord 2 Ypulse: How did you get started in the music business?

Tiffany Alvord: I have always enjoyed singing and performing. I took piano lessons when I was in elementary school and when I was about 10, I began writing songs with my friend at recess. We would perform our songs for our friends in a mini-concert on the playground on Fridays. When my friends came to my house, we would write songs and design CD covers. When I was in junior high school, I got a pink Daisy Rock guitar for Christmas and taught myself how to play it.

Much of my focus was on gymnastics when I was younger and I reached competition levels in junior high. However, I injured myself and had to quit and decided to focus on acting and singing.

YP: What made you decide to create a YouTube channel and did you have any expectation of getting a following or being discovered?

TA: I discovered YouTube when I was 15-years-old. I saw another girl my age who had posted cover songs and had an original song…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I like to keep updated about what’s happening in the world, but not out of obligation, to talk [about it with] someone else or for entertainment.” – Female, 25, MA

“Sexts, hugs, and rock ‘n roll.” That’s how BuzzFeed describes DigiTour, an 18-city bus tour bringing some of the most popular teens on social media to meet crowds of their screaming fans around the country this summer. Most of the digital celebrities involved don’t have traditional talent—but that doesn’t seem to matter. In 2014 the tour sold 120,000 tickets for 60 shows, and they are set to double that number this year. DigiTour could be the “clearest sign yet that the entertainment industry’s star-making apparatus is being turned upside down.” (A topic we explored in depth in our hot-off-the presses trend report.) (BuzzFeed)

As if that wasn’t evidence enough that young consumers are not like you…A recent poll on the American Dream revealed that Millennials’ views of success in America are not the same as older generations. Respondents under 30-year-olds were the most likely to say that having a job that paid well was crucial to attaining the American Dream (47%), and placed more importance on luxury items—travel and the latest technology—than other age groups (32%). (CNN Money)

Are you ready for some fireworks? Fourth of July spending is reportedly up, and 64.4% of consumers plan to celebrate the day. When we surveyed 13-32-year-olds about their plans, only 8% said they weren’t planning to celebrate. We also found that spending for Independence Day shows signs of increasing among Millennials and teens. In 2014 they estimated they would spend an average of $70.21—this year that number went up to $85.56. (MediaPost)

Watching and sharing video content is huge part of Millennials and teens’ online activity—and their mobile behavior. According to Ypulse’s February monthly survey, 50% of 13-32-year-olds say they watch videos on their phones once a day or more. So it makes sense that apps focused on viral video content are a growing category. Minute is a startup video app “for the ADD generation.” The platform finds the most viral parts of online video and turns them into short “Vine-like” clips. (TechCrunch)

Inclusion is becoming increasingly important to young consumers, and the Girl Scouts has made their stance on being an inclusive organization clear this week. The group returned a $100,000 donation after being told the money could not be used to support transgendered girls. To make up the funds, they set up an IndieGogo campaign on Monday, and launched a #ForEVERYGirl campaign to get the message out. The crowdfunding page has raised over $300,000 in three days. (Fast Company)

Want to know more about how young consumers will be spending for the holiday? Our 4th of July Infographic Snapshot has been opened to all our readers—you can click through to see a break down of the red, white, blue, and green in our coverage of what Millennials & teens are buying, and doing, for Independence Day this year. 83% of 14-32-year-olds say they are proud to be an American, and they’re planning to celebrate. Happy 4th everyone! 

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