Q&A WITH LAUREN BERGER, AUTHOR OF ALL WORK, NO PAY

Lauren Berger, 28, is CEO of InternQueen.com, an online internship destination that helps students find and apply for internships while also educating them on how to make the most of their experiences. Her new book, All Work, No Pay: Finding an Internship, Building Your Resume, Making Connections, and Gaining Job Experience, is a guide to help students score the perfect internship, build invaluable connections, boost transferable skills, and ultimately move toward a dream career. Ypulse had the chance to get Lauren's perspective on how internships have changed in our fast-moving, competitive culture and how students and employers can get the most out of the internship experience. 

Ypulse: How has the internship model changed in the past decade? 

Lauren Berger: The model hasn't changed much but due to recent law suits, there is pressure on companies to really structure the internships (a good thing!) It's also become much more popular and competitive over the past 5 years. 

YP: How has the competition among students affected their strategies in the search process?

LB: Students are starting to intern as early as high school! With high school students coming to college WITH internships under their belt, it puts pressure on college students to start interning at an earlier stage of their college career.

YP: Wow, no wonder Millennials are the most stressed generation, and it seems to be getting more intense among the next generation.

YP: In addition to the model becoming more structured, you also talk about protection laws in your book and what interns should know about in terms of labor and ownership of work. Can you describe a bit more about what that entails? 

LB: I believe that young people need to be armed with information. The Fair Labor Standards Act was created by the…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “There are so many places I would love to go! I’ve never been to Greece. I would like to go with some close friends and just take in the local culture and food and relax.” –Female, 30, IN

According to Ypulse’s May monthly survey, 41% of 13-32-year-olds regularly use Spotify to listen to music. But the app wants to be their one-stop-entertainment shop, and has just added video and podcasts to the platform. Media partners, including Slate, BBC, Conde Nast, and Adult Swim, will offer clips of video content to be streamed by users. The move puts Spotify in the ranks of other social platforms “determined to become everything to everyone.” (TechCrunchWired)

While some social media giants (Facebook, Snapchat, and now Spotify) want to be young consumers' portal for all media, others are becoming more and more focused on single functions. New apps Catchpool and This. (with a period) allow users to post only one thing each day, pushing only “high-quality content” into feeds. The approach gets rid of overwhelming social clutter in favor of those things users are most passionate about. (Fast Company)

Pizza Hut is the latest brand to use selfies in marketing—but they’re taking a slightly different approach. Their new two foot pizzas are too big to be captured in a regular selfie, so the chain has created a selfie stick parody PSA, warning against the “dangers of selfie stick abuse.” Branding in the video is purposefully secondary to the entertainment, but the spot does walk a fine line between winkingly acknowledging customers’ behavior, and making fun of them for it. (Adweek)

We’ve told you that Millennials are embracing wine, and that big beer is struggling to win over the new generation of drinkers. Morgan Stanley Research has found the number of Millennials who say beer is their favorite alcoholic drink actually fell over 5% since 2012. In response, we’ve seen beer brands roll out new products, flavors, and campaigns attempting to provide new exciting beverage options for these potential industry killers. (Business Insider)

American Eagle is hoping their new label will help them to win back teens. The brand, Don’t Ask Why, follows the recently popular trends of “soft dressing, restricted sizing, [and] a California aesthetic.” Those qualities make it very similar to the Brandy Melville brand, which has had a lot of success with young female shoppers. Don’t Ask Why is being used to test and experiment with concepts that could be applied to AE products if successful. (Racked)

What if you could collect all the young consumer insights, data, and news most relevant to you in one easily accessed spot? Oh wait, you can! On Ypulse.com, Bronze, Silver and Gold subscribers can click on the star icons next to any insight article or news feed item to immediately store them in the Library tab, creating a repository of relevant information—curated by you. (Ypulse)

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