Q&A With A Teen Jewelry Entrepreneur

Young Millennials are turning to super-niche interests to both soothe themselves and to stand out in the crowd. From baking and crafting to being into Victorian art or old soap operas, young Millennials are a demo looking for and celebrating increasingly narrow diversions. Last year we asked if you were ready for the super niche-interest young Millennials. Today we’re giving you a look at one of their lives, in a Q&A with 15-year-old jewelry entrepreneur Payton Bartos. Payton began making jewelry at age 13 and her hobby has turned into FizzCandy Jewelry, a handcrafted jewelry company that she owns and runs with her mom. Thanks to participation with The Artisan Group, Payton’s jewelry has appeared on an episode of The Vampire Diaries, at The Golden Globes, and was gifted to celebrity guests and presenters at the MTV Movie Awards this year. We talked with Payton, and her mom and business director Mila, about being a teen entrepreneur and maker, having family business meetings in the car, and what the future might hold for her budding business:
 
Ypulse: Take us through how FizzCandy got its start. Did you always dream of being a jewelry designer?
 
Payton Bartos: I’ve always liked doing little projects, like knitting, drawing. A friend of mine introduced me to jewelry and wire crafting. I really just watched her and figured out how to do it myself and I thought I should probably apply this, so I went out and got some wire and a couple beads and started making bracelets. It took me a little while to figure out, but then I started making like 5 pieces at home a night and then I would go into school and give it out to people for free, just because I had too much. My grandmother sold jewelry, so my mom knows a lot about retail, selling, and that kind of market. We had this huge…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I love the Amazon app because I can look up products that I want to buy and store them very easily. I also can scan barcodes while I'm in the store to check for the best price and if I want it, I can click one button to purchase it online instead of paying more for it in a store.” – Female, 29, FL

Millennials might be taking over the office, but their ink is still not totally welcome. According to Pew Research, 40% of Millennials have at least one tattoo, and 70% of the tattooed members of the generation say they hide them from their boss. A recent university survey found that 86% of students with visible tattoos believe they will have a harder time finding a job after graduation. This modern workplace woe could be one of the reasons behind the 46% increase in tattoo removal among young consumers in the last few years. (Time)

Just last month, a report that Walmart “indexes higher” amongst Millennials than with their parents caused some surprise—but now there’s another report here to tell you that Millennials might shop at Walmart, but they don’t LOVE Walmart. The retailer’s score in a metric of customer loyalty and satisfaction among younger shoppers is actually below average, and competitor Target outpaced them in 24 out of 25 scored categories. Amazon’s overall score was over 40% higher than Walmart’s. (Forbes)

The swift redefinition of fame includes a slew of YouTube creatives who have struck gold on the platform, and made millions with their vlogging careers. YouTube’s 5 biggest stars “have more subscribers than the population of Mexico” and some are “making as much money as Hollywood’s biggest stars." So how did they do it? Many were discovered by bigger brands and got some serious corporate backing to help their rise to the top. (Washington Post)

Young consumers have been credited with fueling a gig and sharing economy “revolution”—but proof of it is a little trickier to find. The number of self-employed Americans has actually declined in the past ten years, and the number of those who hold multiple jobs is also on the decline. “Hard evidence” for the impact of the gig economy isn’t clear, but there is also not much research looking specifically at Millennials’ participation. (WSJ)

We’ve seen several startup brands earn Millennials’ attention with video campaigns that have gone viral. (Dollar Shave Club anyone?) E-commerce site Chubbies is hoping for a viral hit of their own to build their young male audience, and the brand is finding their quirky videos are getting more engagement on Facebook than YouTube. One video posted last month has earned 900,000 views, 3,600 likes and nearly 1,000 shares on the platform. (Adweek)

Quote of the Day: “My favorite app is Airbnb because I like to travel on a budget.” –Female, 22, NY

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