Q&A With a 10-Year-Old DJ

We had the opportunity to speak with DJ Niel Mac (real name, Niel McLellan), a 10-year-old DJ with dreams to make it big in the EDM space, to understand how he is already paving the way for his future and how this trend translates to the next generation of Plurals. The youngest cohort of grade-school Millennials are dreaming big and taking the notion of getting ahead to a whole new level. Young Millennials are finding their passions early on and using the fast-paced world of instafame and online accessibility to their advantage. We’ve profiled the rise in super-niche interest Millennials and it is no surprise that some of their focus on what’s unique and up-and-coming has intertwined with the distinctive world of EDM. Built on escapism through intense dance and music in a shared cultural environment, EDM has become an integral part of the young Millennial experience, and the maturity of its after-dark culture has transfixed even those too young to actually attend festivals. The kids rounding out this generation have unfiltered exposure and access to what is beyond their reach, and being raised in a world that increasingly values the entrepreneurial spirit, they are making their passions a reality, despite their young ages.
 
Ypulse: When did you discover your passion for DJing?
DJ Niel Mac: It was about two years ago when my Dad told me that there was a music festival coming to town, the Sun City Music Festival in El Paso, Texas. I went with my dad, and after seeing a lot of the DJs I thought it would be really fun to be there up on the stage and play for so many people, make people happy with music.
 
YP: How did you get your start as a DJ?
NM: I started with a small silver mixer that I found on Craigslist and a small computer with 100 songs. There was a talent show audition at…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I want to buy a home in the future to be able to own and modify my own space. “ –Female, 32, NE

Apple Music is here, but some say that Millennials won’t pay for it. The new music streaming service launched yesterday, and will cost users $9.99 a month to stream the entire iTunes catalog. However, young consumers are adept at getting their music for free, and the CEO of CMJ predicts “for major music audiences at college level and younger music fans…they will be heavily inclined to stay with and find new ‘free’ services,’” (The Daily Beast)

Salad is so hot right now. Farm-to-table salad chain sweetgreen has raised another $35 million to “satisfy Millennial salad cravings.” The chain will likely continue their expansion, and appealing to younger diners with menu items like “Beets Don’t Kale My Vibe” and branded music festivals. Tech is also a part of their plan: sweetgreen is also developing their ordering app, which already handles 25% of all their transactions. (TechCrunch)

They may have grown up with “Made In China” stamped on the bottom of all their toys, but Millennials may be “the most passionate” about products that are made in America. According to a Ford Motor Company poll, 91% of 16-34-year-olds believe that manufacturers in the U.S. make products that are equal or better quality as foreign competitors, and 74% believe purchasing American-made products is important. (We did tell you they’re patriotic) (Washington Examiner)

Earlier this week we told you about Marriott’s efforts to adjust to young consumers’ traveling preferences, and it looks like rooftop bars are only the beginning. The brand has partnered with Universal Music Group to bring music performances by rising and established artists to hotel lobbies. Jessie J kicked off the venture yesterday in London, and all performances will be free to the hotel guests. (LA Times)

Is the sharing economy hurting Millennials? Some experts are saying that while all this car sharing, home sharing, and rent-everything behavior is well and good in the short term, young consumers “are missing out on recouping the gains from owning appreciating assets.” The idea is that the share economy is delaying Millennials' wealth-accumulation, and contributing to their downward mobility. Ouch. (Time)

Our most recent trend report is now available! The Q2 2015 Ypulse Quarterly covers three major trends we see impacting young consumers, and includes recently fielded data on 13-32-year-olds, Ypulse’s expertise, the most relevant takeaways for brands who want to appeal to Millennials and teens, and tons of other insights. The Q2 2015 report is available to Gold subscribers, and one-off pricing is $1250. (Click here to contact us for information on accessing the report or to learn more about subscribing.

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