Q&A With a 10-Year-Old DJ

We had the opportunity to speak with DJ Niel Mac (real name, Niel McLellan), a 10-year-old DJ with dreams to make it big in the EDM space, to understand how he is already paving the way for his future and how this trend translates to the next generation of Plurals. The youngest cohort of grade-school Millennials are dreaming big and taking the notion of getting ahead to a whole new level. Young Millennials are finding their passions early on and using the fast-paced world of instafame and online accessibility to their advantage. We’ve profiled the rise in super-niche interest Millennials and it is no surprise that some of their focus on what’s unique and up-and-coming has intertwined with the distinctive world of EDM. Built on escapism through intense dance and music in a shared cultural environment, EDM has become an integral part of the young Millennial experience, and the maturity of its after-dark culture has transfixed even those too young to actually attend festivals. The kids rounding out this generation have unfiltered exposure and access to what is beyond their reach, and being raised in a world that increasingly values the entrepreneurial spirit, they are making their passions a reality, despite their young ages.
Ypulse: When did you discover your passion for DJing?
DJ Niel Mac: It was about two years ago when my Dad told me that there was a music festival coming to town, the Sun City Music Festival in El Paso, Texas. I went with my dad, and after seeing a lot of the DJs I thought it would be really fun to be there up on the stage and play for so many people, make people happy with music.
YP: How did you get your start as a DJ?
NM: I started with a small silver mixer that I found on Craigslist and a small computer with 100 songs. There was a talent show audition at…


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