Your Trend Guide to Prom This Year

Prom season is upon us, and Millennials in high school are prepping for the big night in their own ways. While exploring current prom trends, we fielded data that supports big departures from trends of generations past, even those of older Millennials. Here are the biggest prom trends we’re seeing surface this year and why these shifts are happening:
 
The Dress Stress 

21% of females rated choosing what to wear as the most important part of prom, putting a lot of pressure on prom shopping. 54% of females have already started shopping for their prom attire (note that it’s mid-April) versus 30% of males who will be waiting until 2-3 weeks before the date to secure their suit or tux. The majority of females (35%) plan to shop at department stores for their selection, while 21% are turning to online stores for the best chance of finding deals for their tight budgets.

Showing up in the same dress as a classmate could be considered “social suicide” so internet savvy Millennials are safeguarding against this potential disaster by creating private, school specific Facebook groups to post pictures of the dresses they’ve chosen. High school Prom Dress Registry groups have been multiplying year by year to ensure that girls are safe from dress duplication before they buy. Members (which can be the entire female population of the school) often post to the group with dressing room selfies, and updates if they change their look or want to sell a dress. One might expect that a group with competition for dresses could become catty, but posts are almost unanimously positive, praising each other on how amazing they look in their dresses, regardless of whether they are boutique, store bought, or a hand-me-down.
 
The More the Merrier

63% of Millennials would prefer go to prom with a…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the day: “I learned to cook with ship-to-home meals like Blue Apron.” –Male, 24, IL

Lego has an imaginary friend that they want you to meet. The brand's latest video campaign, created in partnership with Facebook, asks kids around the world to define and build a “kronkiwongi,” whatever they imagine it might be. The clips celebrate kids’ imaginations and creativity, and the brand is hoping to engage and inspire parents with the content. Participants are encouraged to upload videos of their own kids’ kronkiwongi creations, which will be compiled into a final video showcasing all the submissions. (Campaign Live)

YouTube’s #humblebrag last week was well deserved, as the site comes in at number one for U.S. tweens and teens. According to a survey by KidSay, 89% of 8-15-year-olds use YouTube, and 44% subscribe to between one and 10 channels, while 35% subscribe to more than 21 channels. 29% of tweens and teens say watching videos is what they do most while online, with boys gravitating towards game-related channels and girls watching more DIY, life-style centric channels. According to Ypulse’s social media tracker, 79% of 13-32-year-olds currently say they have a YouTube account. (Kidscreen)

Ever wonder why music taste varies by generation? According to a study by Spotify and Echo Nest data, taste in music is solidified around 33-years-old, after which it becomes more rare to seek out new music. This “taste freeze,” when music preferences are locked in, happens when listeners stop listening to what’s considered popular music, and instead return to “the music that was popular when they were coming of age.” The study illustrates that listeners’ interest in new music continues until around 25, then slows to “maturity” in the mid-30s. (Uproxx)

BMW wants to make Drivers Ed cool. The luxury car brand is offering teens in several major U.S. cities a free, two-hour driving class that teaches “safety and fun” and also puts participants behind the wheels of several BMW models. The free class is a shortened version of their two day, $1,295 hands-on course that lets kids learn about everything from hand placement to high-speed breaking, and take the Beemers out for a spin on a road course to improve their skills, and presumably become more attached to the brand. (Time)

Last week anonymous group Never 21 took over Millennial-favorite brand Forever 21’s flagship store in New York City to spread awareness of the young people of color who were never able to reach age 21 due to police violence. The group hung a #BlackLivesMatter banner in the window and dressed the mannequins in “Black Lives Matter” T-shirts. We’re continuing to see Millennials step forward and become a part of social activism movements around the world. (Refinery29)

Let’s face it—we are living in the age of the selfie. It’s a legitimate Webster term, the new autograph, a way to say hi, and we’ve taken a closer look at the current status of young consumers and the selfie for you. Check out our most recentInfographic Snapshot, which breaks down complex data into an easy to understand and quick to digest visual takeaway. Our Gold and Silver subscribers are given access to our regularly published informative Infographic Snapshots that take our proprietary monthly survey stats and synthesize them to tell a story about this generation’s behaviors and views. (Ypulse)

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