What’s The Next…

What’s the next Harry Potter? What’s the next True Blood? What's the next Hunger Games? As soon as the light of the latest entertainment franchise fades (and sometimes well before it does) we start to hear “what’s the next” questions. With so much of major pop culture coming out of youth culture and YA literature, we try to keep our finger on the pulse of the next big things to watch. When it comes to brands taking advantage of the next big entertainment craze, one of the keys is to be aware and be ready early. With that in mind, we’re giving you a rundown of the entertainment properties that are already gaining buzz and could be future major hits.



Could be the next Life of Pi

The Giver
This YA novel by Lois Lowry came out in 1994 but is considered a modern classic by many, and has been trapped in pre-production purgatory—until now. Oscar winner Jeff Bridges has been trying to make the book into a feature for years, and will produce and star as the original Giver in the film, which could begin filming late this summer. Brenton Twaites, a young Australian actor who is currently not well known in the states has been cast as the main character, Jonas. (He will also be starring in next year’s Sleeping Beauty adaptation Maleficent, and is definitely a young actor to watch.) Though The Giver is dystopian and dark, the movie won’t likely be as action-packed as Hunger Games, as much of the action takes place in the main character’s head as he lives through memories. Like Life of Pi it’s a one-off book about a male protagonist dealing with some heady and dangerous issues, and has the potential to be both beautiful to watch and heart-wrenching.

Why it could (probably will) be big: Millennials from ages 32 to 12 have all likely read The Giver, and it doesn’t take much…


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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “For me being an adult means being entirely independent. I pay my own bills, make all decisions in my life, and feel very in control.”—Male, 20, NY

Gilmore Girls Snapchat filter unlocked big numbers for Netflix. When they took over 200 local cafés to recreate the show’s Luke’s diner and promote the upcoming reboot, Netflix also added Snapcodes to 10,000 coffee cups that gave customers access to a sponsored filter for up to an hour. The filter, which featured a sign from Luke’s and the image of toaster with the show’s premiere date, was viewed 880,000 times and reached more than 500,000 people in one day. Snap to Unlock is a fairly new ad offering from Snapchat that has already been used by Sprite, Burberry, and Cinnabon. (Adweek

REI has tapped into Facebook 360 videos to reach multicultural Millennials. As part of their “Access Outdoors” campaign, the outdoor gear retailer released three two-minute long Facebook 360-degree videos featuring artists in Austin, Chicago and Los Angeles working on art installations. Vix, a publisher whose audience is 65% Hispanic and 12% African-American, was used to share the videos, with the goal that the young residents from the three major cities would see “the outdoors [as] more accessible.” The effort reportedly generated more than 822,000 views on Facebook. (Digiday)

Millennial women have almost closed the alcohol consumption gender gap. According to new analysis: “Men born between 1891 and 1910 were 2.2 times as likely as women to drink alcohol; among people born between 1991 and 2000, that ratio fell to 1.1.” The likeliness of alcohol abuse in young women has also increased from a century ago, and is currently nearly equal to young men. Analysts say the closing of other gender gaps, like education, employment, and status, has given women more opportunities to drink. (The Atlantic

Netflix and Hulu may have some major competition coming their way. LeEco, the "Netflix of China," will launch LeEco Live in America early next year, and will include shows and movies from partners like Showtime and Lionsgate. The brand, which been ‘dominating’ the Chinese market, started as a streaming video service but has grown to also develop tech like TVs, VR headsets, and smartphones. Their new service will be programmed to work seamlessly across these devices, providing a “consistent experience.” (Business Insider

Children’s curiosity is fueling the popularity of nonfiction digital content. Research from Insight Kids’ has revealed that 92% of kids like watching nonfiction entertainment, which can include “tutorials, reality programs, ads/trailers, behind-the-scenes footage, music videos, ‘making of’ content and cast interviews.” Being in control of what they learn is driving their interest, with 62% saying non-fiction content inspire them with ideas on what to learn or do. (Kidscreen)  

Quote of the Day: "I do not want any of the candidates currently in the running to win the election.”—Male, 22, FL

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