What’s The Next…

What’s the next Harry Potter? What’s the next True Blood? What's the next Hunger Games? As soon as the light of the latest entertainment franchise fades (and sometimes well before it does) we start to hear “what’s the next” questions. With so much of major pop culture coming out of youth culture and YA literature, we try to keep our finger on the pulse of the next big things to watch. When it comes to brands taking advantage of the next big entertainment craze, one of the keys is to be aware and be ready early. With that in mind, we’re giving you a rundown of the entertainment properties that are already gaining buzz and could be future major hits.
 

 

 


Could be the next Life of Pi


The Giver
This YA novel by Lois Lowry came out in 1994 but is considered a modern classic by many, and has been trapped in pre-production purgatory—until now. Oscar winner Jeff Bridges has been trying to make the book into a feature for years, and will produce and star as the original Giver in the film, which could begin filming late this summer. Brenton Twaites, a young Australian actor who is currently not well known in the states has been cast as the main character, Jonas. (He will also be starring in next year’s Sleeping Beauty adaptation Maleficent, and is definitely a young actor to watch.) Though The Giver is dystopian and dark, the movie won’t likely be as action-packed as Hunger Games, as much of the action takes place in the main character’s head as he lives through memories. Like Life of Pi it’s a one-off book about a male protagonist dealing with some heady and dangerous issues, and has the potential to be both beautiful to watch and heart-wrenching.

Why it could (probably will) be big: Millennials from ages 32 to 12 have all likely read The Giver, and it doesn’t take much…

 
 

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The Newsfeed

“Crochet and knitting are very relaxing, therapeutic, and have tangible results."—Female, 31, AL

The CW is betting on competitive video gaming being “a perfect match” for their audience. The network now known for popular dramas like Riverdale and Arrow is airing EA Madden NFL 18 Challenge, a “‘Survivor’-style” show where esports celebrities face off each week. The esports special featuring “the biggest and most popular” game was planned after they learned that CW viewers who watch their superhero shows also over index on esports. The show will be live-streamed and then broadcast to the network. (Variety)

Applebee’s has been getting boozy to appeal to Millennial customers—but is it working? Kind of. Their “Dollaritas” and $1 Long Island ice teas (L.I.T.s) are bringing in business; at some locations, lines have reportedly formed out the door and “four keg-sized batches” of L.I.T. are mixed up daily. Applebee’s hopes the promotion will remind young consumers that they’re more than just a chain restaurant—they’re also a bar. But it’s hard to say if the drink specials will solve their Millennial problem in the long-term. (Eater)

2017 has been independent beauty brands’ year, thanks to social media. Cult favorites like Glossier and Colourpop have seen their category’s sales surge 43%, according to the NPD Group, propelled by unboxing videos, influencer collaborations, and Instagrammable products. One editor made the point that “Social media is a hotbed of free consumer research,” which could be why 2017 has seen inclusive brands like Fenty Beauty go viral, and gender genreless makeup lines like Milk Makeup’s “Blur the Line” take off. (Glossy)

More big retailer brands are getting into the subscription box service game, eyeing Stitch Fix’s success. ThredUp, the digital consignment store that focuses on luxury resale, has introduced a new “Goody Box” to package up items each month for customers. Meanwhile, Baby Gap began their “Outfit Box” program in October, offering curated kids clothes sent to Millennial parents. The “experimental effort” has reportedly had high retention rates, prompting the brand to start Superbox, a similar service for Old Navy. (DigiDay)

Pinterest reports that Millennials are looking to their platform for style, food, and home décor inspiration. Half of Millennials use Pinterest at least on a monthly basis, according to comScore, and Pinterest’s new research found that 63% say they “discover new brands or products to buy” on the platform. Ypulse data shows Millennials are looking to social media for fashion inspiration and this study concurs: Pinners were 11% more likely to spend more on style than non-Pinners and 6% more likely to spend more on home décor. (Pinterest)

“I am currently working towards graduating high school with a high GPA and as many college credits as possible.”—Female, 16, MO

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