Power Girls & Gym Class Inspired Style: Teen Mag Round Up

We flip through the pages of teen magazines so you don’t have to, uncovering the trends on the rise and new faces to watch. Here’s what Nylon, Seventeen, and Teen Vogue are serving up for their teen readers: 

1. Spoon University

College students face some unhealthy and unappetizing meal choices, and can fall into the habit of turning ice cream and fries into food groups. Tired of their dining hall status quo, Mackenzie Barth and Sarah Adler decided to take matters into their own hands, launching Spoon University, an on-campus food magazine by students for students. Spoon University was funded on Kickstarter in 2012, offering dorm-friendly recipes, meal ideas, dining hall hacks, and off-campus restaurant recommendations. After graduating in 2013, they moved to NYC, learned how to code, and launched their website, which now gives the dish on the “foodscapes” at more than 50 colleges. Ypulse’s April survey found that 47% of Millennials consider themselves foodies, and it seems even dorm-living isn’t holding back their culinary obsessions. 

2. High Class Gym Class Looks

If you haven’t noticed all of the girls in leggings and guys in joggers, “athleisure” is the new uniform of young consumers. Millennials are slipping into comfortable gym-class inspired fashions even when they don’t plan on breaking a sweat, and Nylon’s “Good Sports” fashion spread shows that high-end athletic looks are having a major moment. Not surprisingly, many teens are reporting Nike and Lululemon as their favorite clothing brands, and more and more retailers and designers, from Forever 21 to Chanel to Under Armour, are producing athletic lines to capitalize on the trend.

3. Power Girls

These magazines are jam-packed with female talent to watch, from the pages of “Power Girls” in Teen Vogue to Nylon’s list of…

 
 

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The Newsfeed

“The wedding trend I have noticed is the white wedding dress being phased out and an array of colors and styles being used.”

—Female, 32, FL

Millennials are about to receive “one of the largest intergenerational wealth transfers in history,” according to UBS. This comes right as they reach peak earning age, making Millennials a powerful spending force—so how can Wall Street pull their purse strings? Besides transparent business practices, they’re expecting on-demand everything across all channels. Easily-navigable banking apps and mobile-first financial advice services are must-haves to impress them. (Business Insider)

Today’s teens are having safer sex, according to a CDC report. Not only are fewer teens having sex, but those that are, are more likely to be using contraceptive methods. Compared to 1988, 9% fewer 15-19-year-old females and 16% fewer males have had sex. The teen pregnancy rate in the U.S. also hit a historic low, with 99.4% of female teens who have had sex using contraception at least once, compared to 97.7% in 2002. (CBS)

Most young consumers use ad blockers, but they don’t always mind seeing ads online—as long as their “space” is respected. Defy Media and TMI Strategy found that 13-25-year-olds were open to seeing ads that are contextually relevant and informative, and don’t interrupt their experience. Anything that “clogs their feed” is off the table, but they’re not averse to all ad placements: 78% don’t consider product placement offensive, 62% follow at least one branded account, and 44% are subscribed to a branded newsletter. (Adweek)

The future of Facebook is going to be a bit more private. Mark Zuckerberg recently announced that the platform’s new mission is to “give people the power to build community and bring the world closer together.” Connecting with friends and family will come back to the forefront, with Groups as a “lynchpin” of this “next era” to make smaller communities and more closed-circle communication a focus, instead of the cluttered public feed. (NYMag)

Japan’s Millennials would stay at one company for life, defying the job-hopping stereotype in favor of job security. From 2001-2015, the percentage of Japan’s Millennials who supported lifelong employment and one-company careers skyrocketed from 64% and 40% to 87% and 55%, respectively. In fact, last year, less than 7% of 25-34-year-olds switched jobs at all. Overall, Japanese employees leave jobs at less than half the rate of Americans, and younger Japanese workers are “even more risk averse.” (Bloomberg)

“I love reality TV shows. It's always fun to watch average people make themselves look foolish just for a shot at fame.”

—Female, 17, CA

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