Popping Up for the Holidays: E-tailers Are Making the Leap Offline for Seasonal Shoppers

It’s a short holiday season this year, with fewer days between Thanksgiving and Christmas than usual. With the cramped shopping season, a trip to the store is feeling pretty harried and rushed for Millennials, who are also often more comfortable buying gifts from behind a screen than then getting stampeded in a store. Cyber Monday was a huge success, following a lackluster Black Friday—perhaps further solidifying the power of the online shopper. But still, shopping offline is a part of Millennials' holiday behavior—and they still plan to get out there with their shopping bags in hand. When we asked 14-29-year-olds where they planned to do the majority of their holiday shopping, 59% told us they would be shopping mostly in-store. As a generation that truly lives with one foot in the digital world and one foot out, it’s not too surprising that they plan to buy gifts that way as well, despite cries by some that they are spending all their time clicking on shopping carts instead of pushing them. Perhaps to match up with Millennials' online/offline mentalities, several online-only stores are bridging the gap into the offline shopper’s world, and bringing their wares to city sidewalks (busy sidewalks, dressed in holiday style) for the season. Here are a handful of the usually online-only brands that are (somewhat surprisingly) setting up temporary shop IRL (in real life):  

1. Amazon Sells Kindles in SF

Though Amazon is a major player in the online shopping world during the holidays—a full 91% of 14-29-year-old Millennials who planned to shop online said they would be buying gifts on Amazon— it seems dominating the shopping lists on the internet wasn’t enough this year. The massive e-tailer set up a series of pop-up shops in malls throughout San Francisco to sell their Kindle…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “Anyone with natural beauty [inspires me the most when it comes to health and beauty]....everyday people more than celebrities or those with heavy makeup or fake bodies.” –Female, 32, NY

Comparing the app usage of the graduating class of 2015 to last year’s grads shows some apps are cooling down, while others have only gotten hotter. A survey found that Snapchat has experienced one of the biggest usage gains, at a 32% increase. But that’s nothing compared to Spotify, which this year’s teens say they are using 78% more than last years’. Meanwhile, Pandora use dropped 11%, perhaps showing the increased streaming competition is impacting them. (Daily Dot)

Millennials are starting to buy houses. According to a Realtor.com site visitor survey, 65% 25-34-year-old respondents said they intend to buy a home within the next three months, compared to 54% in January. Millennials have also reportedly “pulled ahead” of Xers as the largest segment of home purchasers. We’ll have more on Millennials’ house-buying behavior, preferences, hopes, and dreams in our quarterly trend report, coming out next week! (Bloomberg)

Many brands are donning rainbows and posting pride messages in the wake of the Supreme Court decision to legalize gay marriage, and Facebook is giving all its users a way to show their excitement. The social network has a tool to add a rainbow filter to any profile picture, to broadcast support for the decision. We’ve been tracking Millennials’ views on LGBT rights for some time, and the majority of the generation believes the government has an obligation to protect the rights of LGBT individuals. (DigidayFast Company)

Millennials are better savers than many expected them to be, but women 18-33-years-old are saving half as much in their 401(k) as their male counterparts. There are a few reasons for the disparity: Millennial women’s median annual income is still lower than men’s, and they are more likely to be working part time jobs. Millennial women are also carrying a bigger debt burden, with an average of $20,000 in student loan debt, versus male’s $14,000. (Fortune)

Young consumers’ views on privacy are complex. While Pew found Millennials are the most likely age group to be against NSA surveillance policies, another report finds that “an overwhelming majority" are willing to trade privacy for security. When asked “how willing are you to accept inconveniences and a loss of privacy in exchange for better security,” 34% of Millennial males and 46% of females said they are not bothered if it doesn’t impact them too much. (Business Insider)

Our Q2 2015 Quarterly report comes out next week! Four times a year, Ypulse digs deep into three major trends we see changing the way that young consumers view the world, impacting how they behave, and shifting what they expect from brands. Each trend is backed up with recently fielded data on 13-32-year-olds, Ypulse’s expertise on why the shift is occurring, and the most relevant takeaways for brands who want to appeal to Millennials and teens. Here’s a sneak peak of what’s going to be inside! (Ypulse)

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