Phone Wars Update: What Battles Are Brewing In the Smartphone World?

When we asked Millennials to name the one device they can’t live without, more said they can’t live without their smartphones than those who named laptop, tablet, and television combined. This generation is passionate about their mobile devices, and they carry them nearly everywhere they are. 45% of Millennials say that they spend two-ten hours a day on their smartphones, and 44% say they look at their phone over six times in a given hour. With so much of the time and attention of this very desired generation of consumers devoted to their smartphones, it is no wonder that the war around smartphone tech and who can capture the young, often fickle, tech-savvy audience is continuing to rage on. With new entrants into the smartphone competition seeming to pop up at every turn, it can be difficult to keep track of the battles waged within the war, and who is capturing the attention of Millennials. They are seen as the most tend to lead the consumer pack when it comes to tech preferences, influencing everyone from their parents to their friends when it comes to what mobile device to buy. Their own children are being influenced as well—Millennial parents are far more comfortable handing their young offspring a phone to play with, which might help explain why “between 2011 and 2013, the average time a child younger than eight spent on mobile devices tripled from five to fifteen minutes.” To help you keep track of it all, we’re giving you the latest breakdown on the smartphone market: what’s happing now, what’s coming next, and why it all matters. 

Android Could Eclipse iPhone 

iPhone still rules with Millennials: 45% of Millennials ages 14-29 surveyed in early October told us they currently own an iPhone, over 33% who own an Android. But Android is dominating the market otherwise and…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: 

Q: What goals do you have for yourself that your parents did not have? 

A: “Working for myself, finding a career field that fits with both my interests and skills, being in a relationship(s?) that is healthy and promotes growth (not necessarily marriage)…” –Male, 23, D.C.

Summer isn’t over yet, but there is already a prediction for what will be THE toy of the holiday season. The BB-8 droid, viral star of the Star Wars: The Force Awakens trailer, has been made into a real, working remote-control toy “every Star Wars fan has dreamed of owning.” The BB-8 droid can be controlled via smartphone app and with verbal commands, and operates like a remote control car—with the added magic of a robot head staying balanced on top of it. (WSJ)

“Give me my mobile TV!” According to Ericsson’s new media report, more than half of Millennials’ entertainment viewing time (53%) is spent on smartphones, tablets, and laptops. The numbers are even more dramatic among teens, who are watching nearly 75% of their TV and videos on mobile. Unsurprisingly, younger viewers are also watching linear TV less than older audiences, with 60% of 16-34-year-olds watching everyday, compared to 82% of 60-69-year-olds. (The Verge)

Major entertainment brands and TV networks are teaming up to solve the problem of the “growing legion of missing kids.” (See above.) The recently formed Coalition for Innovative Media Measurement is backed by Time Warner, Disney, NBCU, and many others, and is studying the viewing behavior of 2-17-year-olds to create a new measurement system that could account for all of the ways that they consume video—outside of “’old-school’ TV.” (Variety)

The teen years used to be all about fitting in, but for today’s middle and high schoolers, standing out is so much cooler than being like everyone else. Ypulse’s own Chief Content Officer MaryLeigh Bliss weighed in with a little why behind the what: “Teenagers have grown up learning innately about personal branding in order to stand out in a sea of billions of people. If you want followers and likes, you have to display photos and videos that show you doing and wearing interesting things. Otherwise you’re going to fade into the background.” (The Globe and Mail)

Children’s nonfiction is having a moment. Nonfiction children’s book sales have reportedly spiked, going up 38% in the last year for Penguin Young Readers Group. At Scholastic, Minecraft handbooks have in-print figures over 17.5 million, and non-fiction annuals like Scholastic Year in Sports have become so popular they are expanding the series with a gaming edition. (Publishers Weekly)

Quote of the Day: “My aspiration is to retire early and travel!” –Male, 27, CA

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