Olympic Sex Symbols

FHM cover While the original Olympics may have included naked athletes, the current Olympics is definitely coming close to that ideal—especially in sports like beach volleyball. I’m always checking Yahoo! to see what stories and photos are “most popular” online and for the past two weeks its been homoerotic photos female Olympic athletes embracing after victory, patting each other on the…you get the picture. I guess teens get the picture, too. Buzz Marketing sent over a nice summary of how this year’s Olympic games and the subsequent ads and sponsorships featuring athlestes may have crossed the line between sexiness and lack of taste.

From their release:

“High Jumper Amy Akuffa has posed for Playboy, and then partnered with
volleyball player Logan Tom, long jumper Jenny Adams and swimmers
Amanda Beard and Haley Cope for a seductive FHM cover.  But it is not just the women that are sexy- swimmer Ian Thorpe has started an underwear line.”

Buzz’s Blue Fusion research division asked their teens what they thought of the sexiness factor in this year’s Olympics and found “Gen-Y appreciates an athlete who’s not in a regular sport like football or basketball, but the use of heavy sex appeal is transparent to the savvy teen viewers.” Basically all this skin is rubbing today’s now modest/preppy/conservative teens the wrong way.

“While watching the male swimmers splash to the finish line at the
Olympics, one thing was on my mind - why were their swimming trunks so low and tight?...Are they trying to be the next breed of athletes turned sex symbols?...(Making their sport top priority) instead of a Hollywood/sex symbol/make more money attitude I truly believe would make them more sexy.”

Danasia, 17, Ft. Lauderdale

 

 
 

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