Olympic Sex Symbols

FHM cover While the original Olympics may have included naked athletes, the current Olympics is definitely coming close to that ideal—especially in sports like beach volleyball. I’m always checking Yahoo! to see what stories and photos are “most popular” online and for the past two weeks its been homoerotic photos female Olympic athletes embracing after victory, patting each other on the…you get the picture. I guess teens get the picture, too. Buzz Marketing sent over a nice summary of how this year’s Olympic games and the subsequent ads and sponsorships featuring athlestes may have crossed the line between sexiness and lack of taste.

From their release:

“High Jumper Amy Akuffa has posed for Playboy, and then partnered with
volleyball player Logan Tom, long jumper Jenny Adams and swimmers
Amanda Beard and Haley Cope for a seductive FHM cover.  But it is not just the women that are sexy- swimmer Ian Thorpe has started an underwear line.”

Buzz’s Blue Fusion research division asked their teens what they thought of the sexiness factor in this year’s Olympics and found “Gen-Y appreciates an athlete who’s not in a regular sport like football or basketball, but the use of heavy sex appeal is transparent to the savvy teen viewers.” Basically all this skin is rubbing today’s now modest/preppy/conservative teens the wrong way.

“While watching the male swimmers splash to the finish line at the
Olympics, one thing was on my mind - why were their swimming trunks so low and tight?...Are they trying to be the next breed of athletes turned sex symbols?...(Making their sport top priority) instead of a Hollywood/sex symbol/make more money attitude I truly believe would make them more sexy.”

Danasia, 17, Ft. Lauderdale

 

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I am planning to give an iPhone 6s as a gift for this Valentine’s Day.”

—Male, 31, NY

Almost 2/3 of Millennials block ads online, according to one report, and MediaPost recently spoke to young media consumers to find out why. One 19-year-old wishes for digital ads “that [are] barely noticeable,” and suggests to marketers to “stop any ads that hinder the speed and ease of your browsing.” Another 25-year-old tries to support web sites whose livelihood depends on ad revenue by being “more cognizant of which sites are showing me ads to be obtrusive versus showing me ads to support a valuable, but free, service.” (MediaPost)

2016 started strong for Millennials. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that in January, the unemployment rate fell to an eight-year low (4.9%), and it was the second best job growth month ever for 25-34-year-olds, with 429,000 jobs added for this group between December 2015 and January 2016. That’s the highest employment growth since January 2000, when the tech bubble was at its peak and 1.166 million jobs were added. This is a positive sign for the generation, who has been severely impacted by the financial crisis.
(Business Insider

Love is in the air and Millennials are pulling out their wallets. A recent study on finance and relationships revealed that 18-34-year-olds are planning to spend an average $290 on Valentine’s Day activities—almost $100 more than older respondents. Millennial men are planning to spend the most, an average of $371. Ypulse’s Valentine’s Day survey found that the 71% of males 13-33-years-old are buying gifts for significant others/spouses, and mom is second on their list. (NerdWallet

Playboy has put some clothes on to attract Millennials. The brand’s makeover includes more tasteful photos and short-form articles, changes meant to improve sales after years of losing “cultural cachet.” Though the internet, and the wide availability of nudity it offers, certainly hurt Playboy’s bottom line, it also may have inspired their demure new approach. A 2014 redesign to make their website “more PG-13” led to a 258% increase in traffic, and lowered readers’ average age from 47 to 30. With most web traffic stemming from Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, it also makes sense to “play by those networks’ rules”—which means no nudity allowed. (New York Post

Taco Bell’s $5 million secret is out after their big reveal duringthis Sunday’s Super Bowl introduced the world to the quesalupa, “a crunchy quesadilla folded and filled with taco ingredients.” Sound like something you’d want to order? If the answer’s no, it might be because they didn’t make it for you—they’re targeting the next generation. According to the head of the brand’s Insights Lab: “We study gen Z not just because we want to target them, but because we want to get ahead in culture and we want to predict what's going to happen. And also because youth is what our brand DNA is about." (Eater

Quote of the Day: “The issue I am most passionate about is LGBTQ, because in the words of Dr. Seuss ‘A person is a person, no matter how small.’” –Female, 18, KY

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