Olivia Newton John was 30 in 'Grease'

Grease“Grease” was definitely my “High School Musical.” I saw the movie multiple times when it came out and wore out the record acting it out with my best friend. I was always Danny—she was bossy that way. I had it out for ONJ, aka “Sandy.” Even though I loved watching “the transformation” from goody two shoes to smoking harlot, I was even more in love with John Travolta (I think I even scribbled on her face on the inside of my album cover). Jealousy is not pretty.

I have to thank the L.A. Times today for reviving my old feud with one more reason to have hated Olivia. She was a 30-year-old playing a high school senior! Imposter! Actually, I’m quite over it all and am happy to say she ranks much higher than John “Revolta” in my book. All I have to do is think of that image from “Battlefield Earth” and ONJ suddenly seems like a goddess. Plus she redeemed herself for me as a roller-skating loving tween with Xanadu.

More fun teen imposters outed by the L.A. Times, reg. required:

Henry Winkler in “Happy Days”
Henry Winkler, who played the iconic greaser Arthur “Fonzie” Fonazarelli was 29 when “Happy Days” first aired in 1974. Fonzie was said to be a high school drop out, so his age was never clear, but a decent guess is somewhere between 18 and 19 in those early seasons.

Alan Ruck in “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off”
Cameron Frye, the uptight best friend of Matthew Broderick’s Ferris Bueller was in his senior year of high school, but Alan Ruck, the actor who played him, was 30 years old when the duo ditched a day of school.

Benjamin McKenzie in “The O.C.”
A brooding 27-year-old McKenzie stars as moody Ryan Atwood, the high school kid from the wrong side of the tracks, who won’t graduate from high school in the next season.

Sissy Spacek in “Carrie”
The slight, freckled actress was 27 when she played…


Want to talk to us about the article
or dive into a custom study?

Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: "I do not want any of the candidates currently in the running to win the election.”—Male, 22, FL

Snapchat clone Snow is continuing to pull in massive numbers. In a little over a year, the app which lets users add effects, stickers, and filters to their selfies, share their images and videos in a “Story,” and send self-destructing messages, has over 80 million downloads—in comparison, Snapchat had about 10 million downloads in a year after launching. Despite the majority of downloads stemming from Asia—particularly in China where Snapchat is banned—brands like Burger King and Nescafe are jumping on the platform by introducing stickers that can be used on the app globally. (Digiday)

The credit card that has gone viral with young consumers has launched their first marketing campaign. “Reserve What’s Next” is a video series for Chase Sapphire Reserve, featuring James Corden interviewing “innovators in the restaurant, transportation, and lodging fields.” It is aimed “at travelers interested in what’s next in travel,” which describes experience-hungry Millennials. The president of Ypulse, Dan Coates, says the behind-the-scenes approach of the new ads will especially appeal to young consumers, because they “love to geek out over things, digging into the process behind the product.” (The New York Times

They may be digitally-savvy, but Millennials are falling for tech scams more often than you think. A global survey from Microsoft and the National Cyber Security Alliance, found that two in three consumers have experienced a tech support scam in the past year, and 50% of 18-34-year-olds reported to have “continued with a fraudulent interaction.” Pop-ups, unsolicited email, and scam websites have given “an edge” to scammers, who are using them to trick even the “savviest members” of the generation. (Fox News

Nature is often the backdrop for ads targeting Millennials, but many times its intention often misses the mark. The “Millennials-gone-wild” trend in advertising is evoking a sense of freedom for young consumers and allows them to be “more in touch with things that are real, things that are natural as a counter effect to all the digital they have around them.” However, brands need to stay aware of over-saturation, particularly within the apparel industry where the imagery has become stylized and less authentic. (MarketWatch

Dole Food Co. is joining forces with Disney to get kids to eat their fruits and veggies. To fulfill their shared mission of “providing high quality produce to help families lead healthier lives," Dole and Walt Disney Co. have produced a new line of produce branded with Disney characters that will be sold starting next month. The strategy is in line with the food industry’s shift in marketing to focus on parents when selling kids’ products by emphasizing 'health-related benefits,' and adding 'all natural' and 'no sugar' labels. (Los Angeles Times)

Quote of the Day: “The issue I most care about during this presidential election is how we are going to resolve this massive student loan problem.”—Male, 23, PA

Sign Up Now

Subscribe for premium access to our content, data, and tools.

Already a subscriber? Sign in.

Upgrade Now

Upgrade for full access to the best marketing tools for understanding the next generation.

View our Client Case Studies