MTV At 30: Still Pushing Boundaries And Pioneering New Forms Of Media

I Want My MTVMTV turned 30 on Monday, but the network seemed to be the only one not interested in celebrating its major milestone.

Let’s face it, turning the big 3-0 is pretty much the end of youth, but there is no other TV network as synonymous with youth culture as MTV. It’s an institution that has remained relevant to fickle teens and college students for three decades. I can’t think of another that has, year in and year out, maintained that position…except maybe jeans and t-shirts.

MTV has always pushed the boundaries of what is acceptable, sometimes failing, but often spawning major trends: animation for 20-somethings (Liquid Television was a precursor to Adult Swim), reality TV (‘nuf said), news for young people (even Jon Stewart rose to fame on the network)...the list goes on and on.

There are those who lament that the network isn’t what it was 30 years ago, but, frankly, it shouldn’t be what it was then because young people today aren’t the same as young people decades ago. The changing media landscape forced MTV to “evolve and figure out” its new role.

That means, in part, that MTV doesn’t show many music videos any more (though its sister networks do) because times have changed. There are more than enough ways for people to find music videos, as Kurt Loder points out, and MTV specializes in giving viewers what they can’t get anywhere else.

These days, that includes a mix of reality programming and a revival of some old hits. For the nostalgic viewers, the network is bringing back “Beavis and Butthead,” which has the potential to be just as relevant today as it was back in the 90s because the show comes with a new twist. Instead of commenting on videos, the pair makes fun of everything on the network, from music to reality shows. Their sardonic wit is a perfect…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “The best way for brands to interact with my fandom is by watching the series itself and making references only true fans would know.”—Male, 24, CA

There’s a new rosé for the Millennial bro—a "brosé" if you will. Mangrove Estates’s The Drop, named after the surfer term for breaking waves, comes, of course, in a can, and sports the tagline "Quality grapage, no breakage." The brand designed the product with Millennials in mind: "We wanted a tagline that would sum up the way this brand behaves, not just as a wine but in life, embracing all the good stuff and none of the compromise, exactly what Millennials expect." The Drop will be available for bros to drink this summer. (Adweek

Daaaaamn Ellen! Ellen DeGeneres is expanding her empire to include her own digital network with original programming. The Ellen Digital Network will create content across multiple platforms and collaborate with YouTube celebrity Tyler Oakley, and the two teens from the viral “Damn Daniel” video. It will also star Brielle, a four-year-old viral sensation, and include the best user-generated content from EllenTube. DeGeneres is already a digital powerhouse, with more than 1.1 billion total cross-platform views, and averaging 300 million views monthly on YouTube. (Mashable

The rise of “home-tainment,” is encouraging Millennials to skip the bars and stay in to drink. A recent survey from wine app Vivino found that 47% of Millennials would rather drink wine at home than at social gatherings, restaurants, or wineries—and with access to online streaming, food delivery, and dating apps from the comfort of their couches, why wouldn’t they? Another factor to the growth of home socializing may be their wallets: almost six out of 10 Millennials say that cost outweighs all other influences when deciding what to drink. (Business Insider

Hulu has a new competitor in its sights: cable. At the NewFronts, the streaming service announced they’re focusing in on the 70% of Hulu users that watch their service on smart and connected TV devices by providing more premium content and children’s programming. But the big news is that they’ll be going head to head with cable by 2017, offering live sports, event coverage, and news programming for the first time. Hulu’s subscriber count grew by 33% last year, and our latestmedia tracker revealed that 28% of 13-33-year-olds are using Hulu to watch video content weekly or more often. (Kidscreen

We recently noted that VR has the potential to impact many more industries beyond gaming, including entertainment, and live concerts are next to get the VR treatment. Live Nation has scored a deal with NextVR to broadcast hundreds of future concerts, from “intimate performances to very large music festivals,” through VR headsets. Although it will lack the ambiance of crowds, the technology will allow participants to feel as if they were in the front row and truly experiencing the music. For now, the experiences will be limited to free events, but eventually they hope it will be pay-per-view. (Re/code

Quote of the Day: “Whenever I'm bored, I can always find something to do on my phone.”

—Male, 17, GA

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