Monthly Teen Mag Roundup

We’re back with our monthly teen magazine roundup to highlight what’s trending and what’s next in the youth space. Both Seventeen and Teen Vogue’s March issues spotlight some of the top talent and most fashionable looks of the season, but they also address heavy topics such as dating abuse and sexual harassment.

Carly Rae Jepsen Seventeen CoverCarly Rae Jepsen graces the cover of Seventeen this month. The international pop star and new brand ambassador for Candie’s embodies the notion that through hard work, confidence, and sometimes luck, you can succeed. She encourages other girls not to give up either and to stick with what they’re passionate about. As the celebrity judge for Seventeen’s third annual Pretty Amazing Contest, Carly Rae hopes to highlight other young women’s accomplishments as well. Seventeen celebrates real girls year round and the latest issue places emphasis on them with a spread on its Style Council – a group of girls who each have a unique sense of fashion – to pictures of readers showing off their personal style. 

Speaking of fashion, the magazine includes spring must haves and prom inspiration. There’s even a spread with indie band Walk the Moon with fashion that rocks, and a feature on bloggers, DJs, and designers who are sure to be a source of inspiration. Readers can also find icons throughout the magazine that direct them to additional content on Seventeen.com.

The most notable part of the March issue, however, is the abundance of articles about dating, a hot topic that Millennials are redefining. Seventeen helps Millennial girls navigate this complex territory with content about meeting a guy online – it doesn’t always mean you’ll be Catfished – and tips for decoding texts. The magazine even discusses the benefits of having a best guy friend who you can turn to for an honest male’s…

 
 
Ask Millennials some questions.
Log in to get started...

Want to talk to us about the article
or dive into a custom study?


Millennial News Feed

Quote of the day: “I learned to cook with ship-to-home meals like Blue Apron.” –Male, 24, IL

Lego has an imaginary friend that they want you to meet. The brand's latest video campaign, created in partnership with Facebook, asks kids around the world to define and build a “kronkiwongi,” whatever they imagine it might be. The clips celebrate kids’ imaginations and creativity, and the brand is hoping to engage and inspire parents with the content. Participants are encouraged to upload videos of their own kids’ kronkiwongi creations, which will be compiled into a final video showcasing all the submissions. (Campaign Live)

YouTube’s #humblebrag last week was well deserved, as the site comes in at number one for U.S. tweens and teens. According to a survey by KidSay, 89% of 8-15-year-olds use YouTube, and 44% subscribe to between one and 10 channels, while 35% subscribe to more than 21 channels. 29% of tweens and teens say watching videos is what they do most while online, with boys gravitating towards game-related channels and girls watching more DIY, life-style centric channels. According to Ypulse’s social media tracker, 79% of 13-32-year-olds currently say they have a YouTube account. (Kidscreen)

Ever wonder why music taste varies by generation? According to a study by Spotify and Echo Nest data, taste in music is solidified around 33-years-old, after which it becomes more rare to seek out new music. This “taste freeze,” when music preferences are locked in, happens when listeners stop listening to what’s considered popular music, and instead return to “the music that was popular when they were coming of age.” The study illustrates that listeners’ interest in new music continues until around 25, then slows to “maturity” in the mid-30s. (Uproxx)

BMW wants to make Drivers Ed cool. The luxury car brand is offering teens in several major U.S. cities a free, two-hour driving class that teaches “safety and fun” and also puts participants behind the wheels of several BMW models. The free class is a shortened version of their two day, $1,295 hands-on course that lets kids learn about everything from hand placement to high-speed breaking, and take the Beemers out for a spin on a road course to improve their skills, and presumably become more attached to the brand. (Time)

Last week anonymous group Never 21 took over Millennial-favorite brand Forever 21’s flagship store in New York City to spread awareness of the young people of color who were never able to reach age 21 due to police violence. The group hung a #BlackLivesMatter banner in the window and dressed the mannequins in “Black Lives Matter” T-shirts. We’re continuing to see Millennials step forward and become a part of social activism movements around the world. (Refinery29)

Let’s face it—we are living in the age of the selfie. It’s a legitimate Webster term, the new autograph, a way to say hi, and we’ve taken a closer look at the current status of young consumers and the selfie for you. Check out our most recentInfographic Snapshot, which breaks down complex data into an easy to understand and quick to digest visual takeaway. Our Gold and Silver subscribers are given access to our regularly published informative Infographic Snapshots that take our proprietary monthly survey stats and synthesize them to tell a story about this generation’s behaviors and views. (Ypulse)

Sign Up Now

Subscribe for premium access to our content, data, and tools.

Already a subscriber? Sign in.

Upgrade Now

Upgrade for full access to the best marketing tools for understanding the next generation.

View our Client Case Studies