Monthly Teen Mag Roundup

Few phenomena have reached the level of fandom among teen girls as One Direction and “The Twilight Saga,” so it’s only fitting that these two topics appear on the cover of December/January teen magazines. One Direction have established themselves as the most popular young stars this year, and this month marks the end of an era for Twihards with the final film, “Breaking Dawn - Part 2.” We’re sure the newest issues of Teen Vogue and Seventeen will be a favorite among readers for their cover stars, as well as the variety of content packed inside.

Harry Styles Teen VogueEach member of One Direction has their own cover for the latest issue of Teen Vogue, tapping into their enormous influence and providing collectable content, which young people crave. The Fantastic Five, as Teen Vogue calls them, continue to rise in popularity and they’re featured inside the mag with a spread on their massive success, how they got to where they are, the recent release of their second album, “Take Me Home,” and their upcoming world tour.

Speaking of fame,Teen Vogue also features Maude Apatow, the daughter of Judd Apatow and Leslie Mann who’s made a name for herself on Twitter. She’s proving to be a voice of tweens with her relatable and witty tweets and she’s wise beyond her years, as evident from the articles she writes for HelloGiggles. She also explains how she wants to be like Lena Dunham and Sofia Coppola, talented female writers who are role models for many girls as well. Maude is one to watch for providing relatable commentary in 140 characters or less.

When it comes to fashion, this month’s issue highlights how a new generation of girls are proud to wear the pants. They’re embracing pantsuits, showing their power, especially in the business world. They aren’t afraid to rock menswear-inspired styles and they seek to…

 
 

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The Newsfeed

Quote of the Day: “My favorite brand on social media is Complex, because it's more of an online network that reports on urban culture.”

—Male, 23, MI

Luxury watch brands are innovating to cater to what could be their biggest opportunity: Generation Z. A September 2016 survey from Mintel found one in five 16-24-year-olds reported they were thinking of buying a watch “in the coming months,” and that “the young are the biggest buyers of all age groups.” As a result, watch brands are taking marketing online. Omega says that social media is not part of their marketing strategy but “the way [they] communicate.” (Financial Times)  

A group of moms is making hijabs for Barbie to battle Islamophobia. Created through a partnership with the non-profit For Good, Hello Hijab sells $6 handmade headscarves for dolls, available April 1st, along with a card explaining what the accessory is. As one founder explains, the aim is for a more inclusive generation: “They will see it as a kind memory from their playtime, and then they will grow into a kinder generation…used to playing with dolls that look different to them.” Profits from the new doll accessory will go to support multicultural communities. (RT)

Netflix is winning the “steaming wars”—at least on home TV sets. comScore’s analysis into video streamed over Wi-Fi to televisions in U.S. homes found Netflix’s penetration is around 40%, while YouTube, the next most-used service, was less than 30%. Both Amazon and Hulu are far behind at below 20%, but the latter was found to have engagement rates on par with Netflix: “People who do use [them] use [them] a lot…Both services engage their users for more than 25 hours a month.” (Recode)

Chipotle wants to "slyly” promote kids’ healthy food habits with an unbranded video series. RAD Lands, available for purchase on iTunes, follows “the Cultivators” as they try to save the galaxy’s animals and plants, and features cooking segments with celebrity chefs and musical appearances by the likes of Biz Markie and Wayne Coyne of the Flaming Lips. Described as an “entertainment Trojan horse,” the series is all about educating the next generation while also making a play to win back consumers after the brand’s food-related illness issue. (Ad Age

Airbnb is launching Aibiying, a new brand to target Chinese Millennials. The company’s research has shown an increase of 142% of travel out of China in 2016, and 80% of their users in the country are under 35. The young travelers are also a “lucrative market” according to one expert: "Chinese Millennials are likely to travel farther afield -- and to spend more while traveling—as their disposable incomes and appetite for adventure grow." Aibiying, which translates to "Welcome each other with love,” will include the brand’s latest “Trips” and “Experiences” features. (Inc.

Quote of the Day: “Budweiser ads are memorable because they pull at the heart strings with the horses and dogs.”—Female, 22, CA

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