Millennials Reveal Who Represents Their Generation

Mark Zuckerberg. Lady Gaga. Justin Bieber. These are among some of the top influencers among Millennials since they’ve induced innovation across society and paved the way for a generation of individuals who seek to make a name for themselves too. We recently surveyed 400 14-34-year-olds asking who they believe defines their generation, and it’s no surprise that some of the most creative, active, and cause-driven stars were the ones they mentioned the most.

Mark Zuckerberg is a top Millennial icon since he has achieved entrepreneurial success, which many young people hope to reach too. He had a great idea that’s shaped society and he brought it to life while still in college. They know his story thanks to “The Social Network” and feel a connection to him since he produced a product that is of huge importance to their generation in particular. Facebook isn’t just a way to communicate with friends; it’s become a lifeline for many young people to stay informed about the world at large. Many Millennnials aspire to create something as powerful as he did and they appreciate that amidst his success, he’s still laid-back, wearing jeans and hoodies to work.

Believe it or not, but Bieber is also someone who they feel represents their generation since he’s led the way in using social media to become a star. Many young people feel responsible for his fame as they found him on YouTube, contributed to his videos going viral, and were part of the inescapable phenomenon that’s become Bieber Fever. To many, he proves that anything is possible and you can use platforms like YouTube and Twitter to create a brand. His story is also very transparent since the public was part of his journey, and his rise to fame was depicted in the movie “Never Say Never.” But most of all, he’s shown that it’s possible…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I participated in Bikram Yoga, because I found a few YouTube tutorials on it.” –Female, 24, MN

Being featured in the (racy) lyrics of Beyoncé’s hit single “Formation” has caused Red Lobster’s sales to spike 33%. But a wave of frustration hit Twitter after the brand took too long to respond to the song, and failed to live up to expectations. One user advised,“Yo @redlobster, all you have to do is NOT f*** up. Just give the Twitter over to your highest ranking Black person under 33. Trust me.” But after eight hours Red Lobster tweeted an underwhelming: "Cheddar Bey Biscuits" has a nice ring to it,don't you think? #Formation @Beyonce.” The indecent highlights what young consumers expect from brands on social media. (MediaPostBuzzFeed)

The newly funded Stash investment app is hoping to “break down the barriers that prevent nearly three quarters of Millennials from investing.” To appeal to the risk-averse generation, the app allows users to invest as little as $5, and describes investments in easy theme-like terms, like “Clean and Green.” For the founders it’s all about setting up users for the long-term: “By lowering the minimum level of investment, enabling Millennials to invest in broad themes that they care about, and guiding them along the path toward building smart lifelong investment habits, Stash has the potential to empower an entire generation to reach their financial goals.” (Business Wire)

Fit has gone glam for Millennials—and not just in the U.S. Young Chinese women are embracing working out, and shifting traditional beauty ideals. In a 2003 survey, 1,000 working females cited an ideal body to be "an almost-emaciated, willowy physique," but social media and celebrity influence, as well as more awareness to physical health, are making strength the new goal. Women sharing their fitness journeys are becoming major influencers and creating new personal brands, and the fitness industry in China has grown 13% yearly since 2010. (Refinery29)

ESports—multi-player competitive video gaming—is expected to generate $463 million in ticket sales, merchandise, sponsorships, and advertising for 2016, and networks want a piece of the action. But can it translate to TV? TBS is premiering E-League, a 10-week eSports competition series that will stand as a true test on whether the phenomenon can “find the right balance between achieving scale and retaining its core audience of digitally forward young men.” Critics have good reason to be skeptical: ESPN2’s airing of an eSports college competition perplexed viewers, frustrated broadcasters, and scored a 0.1 Nielsen rating. (Adweek

British director Anthony Wilcox’s new action-packed thriller,Shield 5, is captivating audiences—the Instagram audience that is. The series, which currently has 30,000 followers, is being called “social cinema,” and each episode is the length of an Instagram video: just 15-seconds. Wilcox’s love for fast-turnaround projects and very low budget is what ultimately inspired him to choose the platform. There was also the potential to go viral: "If you’ve got the opportunity to show your work to a much, much bigger audience…all around the world, it might be worth trying it." (Fast Company

Quote of the Day: “I share my selfies by making it my profile picture.” —Female, 23, IL

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