Millennials & Gen Z’s 10 Favorite Tech Brands

Tech brands top the list of brands that young consumers think are most innovative, and the kinds of brands they say they’re loyal to—but which tech brand is their favorite? We asked 1000 13-34-year-olds to tell us…

When we explored the brand loyalty of young consumers in our recent trend Loyal-ish, we found that overall, young consumers are more likely to say that they “have a brand they prefer but don’t mind using other brands” than that “they have one brand they like and will always use”—except when it comes to technology. Almost half of 13-34-year-olds told us that they will always use the brand of smartphone that they already like, and only 13% told us that the brand of their smartphone doesn’t matter to them—far lower than categories like personal care products, food/beverages, and clothing/accessories.

As we’ve said before, their dedication to their tech brands is likely a result of just how embedded their devices are in their lives. Tech addiction is a very real thing, and unsurprisingly, young consumers struggle most. GfK’s global study shows that a third of internet users find it difficult to disconnect, jumping to 44% for 15-19-year-olds, followed closely by those 20-39-years-old. Because of their attachment to tech, we’re always looking at their feelings about devices and screens, from the tech Millennials think is the coolest on the market to their tech shopping habits. But what are their favorite tech brands? In our recent monthly survey of Millennials and Gen Z, we asked 1000 13-34-year-olds to tell us, “What is your favorite technology brand?”* to find out. Here are the top 10 responses:

*This was an open-end response question to allow us to capture the full range of tech brands that Millennials and Gen Z like most—without our preconceived ideas shaping their…

 
 

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The Newsfeed

“Crochet and knitting are very relaxing, therapeutic, and have tangible results."—Female, 31, AL

The CW is betting on competitive video gaming being “a perfect match” for their audience. The network now known for popular dramas like Riverdale and Arrow is airing EA Madden NFL 18 Challenge, a “‘Survivor’-style” show where esports celebrities face off each week. The esports special featuring “the biggest and most popular” game was planned after they learned that CW viewers who watch their superhero shows also over index on esports. The show will be live-streamed and then broadcast to the network. (Variety)

Applebee’s has been getting boozy to appeal to Millennial customers—but is it working? Kind of. Their “Dollaritas” and $1 Long Island ice teas (L.I.T.s) are bringing in business; at some locations, lines have reportedly formed out the door and “four keg-sized batches” of L.I.T. are mixed up daily. Applebee’s hopes the promotion will remind young consumers that they’re more than just a chain restaurant—they’re also a bar. But it’s hard to say if the drink specials will solve their Millennial problem in the long-term. (Eater)

2017 has been independent beauty brands’ year, thanks to social media. Cult favorites like Glossier and Colourpop have seen their category’s sales surge 43%, according to the NPD Group, propelled by unboxing videos, influencer collaborations, and Instagrammable products. One editor made the point that “Social media is a hotbed of free consumer research,” which could be why 2017 has seen inclusive brands like Fenty Beauty go viral, and gender genreless makeup lines like Milk Makeup’s “Blur the Line” take off. (Glossy)

More big retailer brands are getting into the subscription box service game, eyeing Stitch Fix’s success. ThredUp, the digital consignment store that focuses on luxury resale, has introduced a new “Goody Box” to package up items each month for customers. Meanwhile, Baby Gap began their “Outfit Box” program in October, offering curated kids clothes sent to Millennial parents. The “experimental effort” has reportedly had high retention rates, prompting the brand to start Superbox, a similar service for Old Navy. (DigiDay)

Pinterest reports that Millennials are looking to their platform for style, food, and home décor inspiration. Half of Millennials use Pinterest at least on a monthly basis, according to comScore, and Pinterest’s new research found that 63% say they “discover new brands or products to buy” on the platform. Ypulse data shows Millennials are looking to social media for fashion inspiration and this study concurs: Pinners were 11% more likely to spend more on style than non-Pinners and 6% more likely to spend more on home décor. (Pinterest)

“I am currently working towards graduating high school with a high GPA and as many college credits as possible.”—Female, 16, MO

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