Millennials Fight for Superwomen

Though the gender gap is ever narrowing, certain industries have yet to represent women in a significant way, and the comics industry is a repeat gender offender. We see scores of films and print publications distributed that put male writers and superheroes in the thick of the action, but fail to explain where the female heroes are. To Millennial women, who are happy to declare themselves fangirls, the absence is noticeable and often infuriating. At New York’s Comic Con this year, the co-founder of Alpha Girl Comics lamented that “Wall Street does a better job” towards closing the gender gap than her own industry. Those on the “Women in Comics” panel noted that almost half of the convention’s attendants were women, yet only 6% of the special guests were females. Adding insult to injury, 20% of digital comic readership is fueled by women, illustrating a great disparity between the ripe female comics market and the current strides towards representing them. Millennials are demanding that female superheroes be put in the spotlight, and taking it upon themselves to make it happen.

The lack of women in comics is not for lack of talent, but disregard for (or utter ambivalence to) the prospect of female superheroes within the industry, with industry execs claiming “We don’t know how to sell it.” With power players refusing to put superwomen on the screen, younger illustrators are the ones taking risks in order to bring something different to comic strips. The newest character introduced to Marvel’s lineup is Kamala Khan, a Muslim teen superheroine that breaks the traditional comic mold, introducing religious affiliation and racial diversity to the standard white-male superhero spectrum. Kamala deals with all of the tropes of being a teenage girl living in a conservative household,…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “Next winter I will be going on a solo backpacking trip through Southeast Asia and India. I plan to visit ashrams in India, go hiking and kayaking through SE Asia, try new cuisines, meet locals, and get off the beaten path.” – Female, 26, CO

Last month, we told you we could be seeing the end of the long-standing “sex sells” standby thanks to the “seen it all” generation. Now more research is backing up the idea that sex doesn’t actually sell. Ad testing firm Ameritest asked consumers about Carl’s Jr.’s latest spot featuring a nearly-naked model and found 32% felt worse about the brand after seeing the ad, compared to 8% who feel the same after watching an average fast food commercial. (DigidayAdAge)

A new wave of live streaming apps have been gaining young consumers’ attention—but how are they stacking up against more established social media platforms? Horizon Media’s infographic looks at the state of apps like Meerkat and Periscope, and finds 18-34-year-olds are more likely than older consumers to use them. But while Millennials are also more likely to have heard of these live streaming apps, awareness is still quite low compared to Snapchat, Instagram, and Vine. (Adweek)

The Good Humor man is getting a makeover to appeal to the next generation of ice cream consumers. The brand says they’re changing their trucks to capture the attention of today’s kids, who may be too distracted by devices to hear them coming down the street. In some areas, drivers are being given a more modern dress code, and the now brightly painted trucks’ jingles are being changed to pop hits from artists like Beyoncé and Taylor Swift. (NYPost)

Millennials want to work in tech—specifically for Google. A new report found that tech brands take up the top three spots in the list of places 18-34-year-olds would want to work, with nearly 20% naming Google as their ideal employer, 13% naming Apple, and 9% naming Facebook. Google’s top ranking is fairly unsurprising considering their consistently high marks in employee perks and benefits. (Business Insider)

Emoji are replacing internet slang, infiltrating fashion, and more brands have been creating emoji-centric marketing campaigns in order to appeal to Millennials and teens. Now nonprofit hotline BRIS has launched Abused Emojis, a new emoji alphabet that includes icons for parent drinking, a child being hurt, thinking about death, and other difficult issues. The intention is for kids to use these symbols “to talk about situations where they felt bad or wrongly treated” without having to verbalize their complex problems. (Fast Company)

We give you a dose of insights on young consumers each day, but every quarter, we zoom our lens out to look at some of the larger trends happening with Millennials and teens—and why they matter to brands. Our Gold subscribers have access to the Ypulse Quarterly report, which synthesizes the major trends and stats we’ve seen over the last quarter of the year. We take a close look at the "why behind the what" of big shifts and provide in-action examples and supportive data, along with implications for you to take away. (Ypulse)

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