Meeeeerrry Marketing!

We are four days away from Black Friday and the beginning of the holiday shopping season. Even though turkeys haven’t yet been carved, most brands have already begun their holiday advertisements in full force. 34% of Millennials ages 14-29 plan to start their shopping on Friday, so the merry marketing makes sense. But in a world flooded with commercials, it takes a lot to stick in consumers' minds during the busiest time of year. For distracted Millennial viewers especially, most holiday marketing flows in one ear and out the other, and a simple commercial probably won’t stick in their minds. But smart brands are thinking outside the green and red wrapped box, putting out campaigns that invite interaction, demand attention, and make holiday marketing something to look forward to. Here are three of the early standouts for the merriest marketing of 2013:

1. Kmart Show Your Joe
We said that an ordinary commercial wouldn’t be enough to make Millennials remember a brand’s holiday efforts…but this commercial isn’t so ordinary. Kmart’s Show Your Joe campaign centers around the retailer’s Joe Boxer offerings, and it rings in the season in a way that has actually managed to spark scandal. In it, a row of guys wearing tuxedo tops and boxer bottoms play “Jingle Bells” by swinging their hips and making music with bells we’re left to assume are attached you know where. The video has currently reached over 13 million views on YouTube with comments ranging from high praise to majorly scandalized. But thanks to its viral status, the spot is being discussed everywhere in the media, increasing Kmart’s holiday exposure exponentially. As Adweek put it, “sometimes it’s just better to be on the naughty list,” or as one male Millennial told us, “People haven’t cared about Kmart this much…


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Millennial News Feed

Since we first wrote about the best dressed generation, the trend of mini-fashionistas earning Instagram fame has only continued and grown. Some parents of these pint-sized digital celebrities, who the Times has dubbed “Instamoms,” work with brands to feature clothing and products in post in exchange for payment. While the kids are undoubtedly adorable, one consulted psychologist compares the practice to the “pageant world.” (NYTimes)

Spotify has released their year in review results, and Millennial artists are ruling the streaming waves. Drake was the most streamed artists of the year, Rihanna was the most streamed female artists, Justin Beiber received the most streams in a single day, and The Weeknd had the most streamed album. One important note: Taylor Swift and Adele are not included in the ranking because they do not make their music available on the service. (The Verge)

Over thirty percent of Millennials see credit cards as “old school,” according to PayPal’s shopping research. This attitude could be because of their increasing affinity towards mobile and digital payments, and PayPal declares that this means, “’Millennials want credit that is as digitally native as they are.’” The e-pay brand also found that Millennials are more likely than any other generation to say they are more likely to trust companies that are tech-based. (Marketingland)

Cereal was once as much a part of childhood as Saturdaymorning cartoons, but the boxed breakfast is on the decline with children, and Millennials. Young consumers have been turning to lower sugar, portable food options like Greek yogurt, and “kids today don’t identify with cereal as much as the older generations once did.” Brands are pivoting marketing and products to adjust to the shift, and Kellogg has experimented with playing on Millennials’ nostalgia to get them back in the cereal aisle. (The Atlantic)

Quote of the Day: “This holiday season, I’m buying myself a GoPro.” –Male, 28, MI

Teens may not be able to remember a time before the internet—but that doesn’t necessarily make them more internet-savvy than older users. Research in the UK found that only 31% of 12-15-year-olds and 16% of 8-11-year-olds could tell the difference between Google ads and Google search results, even when ads were labeled. The findings indicate that young consumers still need to “develop the knowhow they need to navigate the online world.” (The Verge)

Last week, Pew survey results showing that 40% of Millennials are “against free speech” that is offensive to minority groups were widely reported—but a closer look might prove those conclusions were a “false alarm.” Though there is no data to directly compare the question to, there are “numerous examples” that show that multiple generations have held similar views for decades. (NYMag)

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