March Madness For Sneaker Style

NCAA Sneaker StyleIf you somehow haven’t noticed, March Madness is going on right now. Not only is it one of the greatest spectacles in sports, it’s also a sort of fashion show for sneaker heads. From Creighton’s Gregory Echenique’s hot pink kicks in honor of his coach’s wife who survived breast cancer to Wichita State’s Sean Ogirri’s shocking yellow shoes that match his electric play, there’s as much to watch for on the players’ feet as there is in game action. UNC, Cal, Georgetown, and Marquette’s teams were wearing customized 2012 Air Jordans. No doubt sneaker fans have been watching games to scope out new trends.

Like jeans and t-shirts, sneakers are a staple of the Millennial wardrobe, and many teens and 20-somethings elevate sneaker culture to high style. It helps that there are so many limited edition and one of a kind pairs of kicks to choose from. They’ve become so sought after that a few riots have broken out at stores carrying highly limited — and very expensive — special editions.

Part of growing up used to mean ditching sneakers for more expensive work-appropriate shoes, but older Millennials have changed that — think Mark Zuckerberg going to work in sandals. Sneakers have become perfectly appropriate for kids as well as adults, and instead of showing style maturity by lacing up a pair of oxfords (or putting on pumps), pulling on a pair of studded Converse by John Varvatos does the trick equally well because the sneakers are high style and laid back at the same time. It helps that haute couture brands, such as Christian Lacroix and Louis Vuitton, have embraced sneakers, as well as designer collaborations, including Yohji Yamamoto for Adidas, Liberty for Asics, and even Kanye West for Nike.

For all the high end collaborations, some sneaker fans just want to…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I like to keep updated about what’s happening in the world, but not out of obligation, to talk [about it with] someone else or for entertainment.” – Female, 25, MA

“Sexts, hugs, and rock ‘n roll.” That’s how BuzzFeed describes DigiTour, an 18-city bus tour bringing some of the most popular teens on social media to meet crowds of their screaming fans around the country this summer. Most of the digital celebrities involved don’t have traditional talent—but that doesn’t seem to matter. In 2014 the tour sold 120,000 tickets for 60 shows, and they are set to double that number this year. DigiTour could be the “clearest sign yet that the entertainment industry’s star-making apparatus is being turned upside down.” (A topic we explored in depth in our hot-off-the presses trend report.) (BuzzFeed)

As if that wasn’t evidence enough that young consumers are not like you…A recent poll on the American Dream revealed that Millennials’ views of success in America are not the same as older generations. Respondents under 30-year-olds were the most likely to say that having a job that paid well was crucial to attaining the American Dream (47%), and placed more importance on luxury items—travel and the latest technology—than other age groups (32%). (CNN Money)

Are you ready for some fireworks? Fourth of July spending is reportedly up, and 64.4% of consumers plan to celebrate the day. When we surveyed 13-32-year-olds about their plans, only 8% said they weren’t planning to celebrate. We also found that spending for Independence Day shows signs of increasing among Millennials and teens. In 2014 they estimated they would spend an average of $70.21—this year that number went up to $85.56. (MediaPost)

Watching and sharing video content is huge part of Millennials and teens’ online activity—and their mobile behavior. According to Ypulse’s February monthly survey, 50% of 13-32-year-olds say they watch videos on their phones once a day or more. So it makes sense that apps focused on viral video content are a growing category. Minute is a startup video app “for the ADD generation.” The platform finds the most viral parts of online video and turns them into short “Vine-like” clips. (TechCrunch)

Inclusion is becoming increasingly important to young consumers, and the Girl Scouts has made their stance on being an inclusive organization clear this week. The group returned a $100,000 donation after being told the money could not be used to support transgendered girls. To make up the funds, they set up an IndieGogo campaign on Monday, and launched a #ForEVERYGirl campaign to get the message out. The crowdfunding page has raised over $300,000 in three days. (Fast Company)

Want to know more about how young consumers will be spending for the holiday? Our 4th of July Infographic Snapshot has been opened to all our readers—you can click through to see a break down of the red, white, blue, and green in our coverage of what Millennials & teens are buying, and doing, for Independence Day this year. 83% of 14-32-year-olds say they are proud to be an American, and they’re planning to celebrate. Happy 4th everyone! 

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