Macklemore and Ryan Lewis: So much more than thrift shopping

Today’s post comes from Ypulse staffer Phil Savarese.

Macklemore and Ryan Lewis topped the charts in late 2012 with their song “Thrift Shop” feat. Wanz. The music video has over 180 million views on YouTube and is still the number one song on Spotify in the United States. The duo’s hit single exemplified the Millennial ideals of budgeting, reason, and YouTube. Their full album, The Heist, provides an even more applicable story to Millennial culture. Each track is different, and tackles a different subject. Some illustrate the struggle of young artists, others talk about, well, thrift shopping. There are a few songs that do give insight into the minds of an idealistic Millennial, and are worth noting for anyone who has their eye on the generation. 

"Ten Thousand Hours" is the first track of the album. The title refers to the seemingly endless amount of time Macklemore has invested in pursuing his passion for music. It’s no secret that Millennials want to do the same. “I stand in front of you today all because of an idea, I can be who I wanted if I could see my potential.” Like Macklemore, Millennials are all about maximizing their potential, and he has turned that potential into success, noting full-on dedication; “The greats weren’t great because at birth they could paint. The greats were great because they paint a lot.”

“Make the money, don’t let the money make you. Change the game, don’t let the game change you.” This is the chorus of the track "Make the Money", which is featured in a trailer for the movie 42 that depicts the story of Jackie Robinson. The song encourages others to strive for success without compromising themselves, urging his listeners to “stay true”. Once again, the songs are in line with the Millennial aspiration to succeed, but not concede their values and…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “Bojack Horseman was my favorite show last year because it was funny and real. Maybe too real, just beautiful.”–Male, 23, AZ

Binge drinking in college is common, and suggested reasons for the behaviors range from boredom to helicopter parenting—but it’s also possible they’re drinking to extremes to escape extreme stress. Today’s college students can have an “intense preoccupation with success” thanks to the competition it takes to get into schools, fear of the tough job market, and looming loan debt. In this context, “blacking out has become so normal that even if you don’t personally do it, you understand why others do. It’s a mutually recognized method of stress relief. To treat it as anything else would be judgmental." (NYTimes)

Once again, Millennials’ food preferences are “killing” a major product. Young consumers’ preoccupation with health have caused a yogurt problem for General Mills, where sales in the category have nosedived 15%. The downturn is likely due to the new perspective that sugar, not fat, is the real diet evil, a shift that has caused low-fat and low-cal foods to “fall out of vogue.”(As we predicted.) In more positive, related, news for the brand, organic and natural products have seen “immense growth.” (MediaPostMSN)

More teens are on YouTube than on the biggest social networks, according to research from the National Cyber Security Alliance and Microsoft. Their poll of 13-17-year-old internet users found that 91% say they use YouTube, compared to 66% who use Snapchat, 65% who use Instagram, and 61% who use Facebook. Their heavy use of the site is one of the reasons that YouTube creators have more influence over their purchase intent than traditional TV and movie celebs. Interestingly, the second most-used platform was actually Gmail, with 75% of teens reporting they use the email app. (eMarketer)

Millennials have been called out as a threat to the diamond industry, causing Twitter to offer their own blunt explanationsfor why the generation isn’t buying the “sparkly status symbols.” But hold up: De Beer’s annual report has declared, “Millennials spent nearly $26 billion on diamond jewelry [in 2015]…acquiring more than any other generation.” So why is everyone saying they aren’t buying diamonds when they reportedly purchased 45% of retail sales in four major markets? It might be another case of a narrative about the generation being more click-worthy than the reality. (Forbes)

This month, the Generation Beauty event brought together Instagram beauty influencers, beauty brands, and their loyal teen fans for a weekend of meet-and-greets and product samples. Young consumers are undoubtedly looking to their favorite digital personalities for product recommendations, and say it’s best “when they give their honest opinion,” trusting those posts more than those where copy is read directly off a package—“a dead giveaway that it’s sponsored.” Collaborations between brands and social influencers are reportedly especially popular with fans. (Racked)

Quote of the Day: “Jane the Virgin was my favorite show to watch last year because it was dramatic, yet relatable and hilarious. I also love the fact that it features many women actors and actors of color.” –Female, 17, Guam

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