How Twitter Is Changing TV

When Twitter launched in 2006, many people—including the New York Times— didn’t even know how to describe the network. The concept of micro-blogging, or constant updating seemed like it could be a fad, and many wondered how long Twitter would last. Others thought that it was just a network for people who liked to tell everyone what they were eating and doing every second of the day. In the last seven years that has all changed, and Ypulse’s most recent research (fielded in November 2013) found that 47% of Millennials 14-29 use Twitter, with 22% of those reporting that they actively post and comment on the network. With Twitter rivaling Facebook in popularity with Millennials it has become a cultural force, changing the way that they get their newstell stories, and even mourn loss. But Twitter is also beginning to alter a place many never expected it to: the television landscape. Millennial’s definition of entertainment is a fluid one, and in the fractured entertainment world technologies are merging and affecting each other in surprising ways. Twitter, a platform not even a decade old, is changing the way we talk about, interact with, and watch TV. Here are three ways it’s happening:  

1. It made the water cooler virtual, and put it in hyper-drive: 

With more shows to watch than ever before thanks to streaming originals, the explosion of award-worthy cable players, and access to a seemingly endless amount of previously aired shows, not everyone is watching the same thing at the same time. Discussing the latest plot twists of your communal favorite shows isn’t necessarily a workplace pastime in this new environment, but thanks to Twitter (and other social media) the water cooler lives on, online. The circle discussing television events might not know one another, but they are…


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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “When I turn 14 soon I can get a job if I want and start saving for my first car with that money and the money I make on eBay.” –Male, 13, FL

ABC Family is no more—say hello to Freeform. The network is changing their longstanding name in order to attract viewers 14-34-years-old, an audience they are calling “Becomers,” and we know as Millennials. The network sees the rebrand as an natural continuation of their last decade targeting young viewers experiencing their firsts. According to ABC’s research, the name “Family” was a barrier to some new customers. (EW)

Millennials are more wary of credit cards than older consumers, but among those who do have them, they’re not necessarily making their credit scores a priority. According to a report by LoanDepot, only 48% of Millennials know their credit score, compared to 60% of Boomers, and only 37% are confident in their ability to manage credit. (Business Insider)

Our most recent trend report explored all of the ways that Millennials are communicating, online and off, including their love of emojis and GIFs. We found 60% of 13-33-year-olds use emojis once a day or more, and it looks like they’re not the only generation embracing the icons. A study by platform Emogi found that though consumers under 35-years-old are more likely to use them, 62.3% of those over 35 are also frequent users. (Adweek)

The online video market is exploding, and Refinery 29 is one of the sites investing in video to give their Millennial readers even more reason to visit. Refinery is launching 29 new series, 75% of which are original programming, and the videos are being released at a “rate of about 100 a month.” But the content shares some common threads: female empowerment, positivity, and optimism. (Fast Company)

Hyper-personalized products and marketing are an emerging trend, and Uniqlo has a tech-forward take on it. The retailer has created UMood, a machine that helps choose consumers’ clothing based on their mood. Currently being used in Australia, the machine uses brainwave sensors to read how they’re feeling, and then suggests a t-shirt to fit their disposition. (brandchannel)

Quote of the Day: "I want to be able to have, and provide for, a family in the next 3-4 years.” –Male, 20, NC

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