Has Sex, Drugs, and Rock & Roll Been Replaced With Social Media?: The Friday Don’t Miss List

Social media usage may be replacing drug usage for teens, Snapchat’s first in-app filter game, it takes a co-working space to raise a child, and more stories to cap off your year!

1. Has Sex, Drugs, and Rock & Roll Been Replaced with Social Media?

Today’s teens are just not the same as teens ten years ago. Being brought up during a time of social media has molded behaviors that set them apart from Millennials—as highlighted by our latest Teen Snapshot trend. Don’t miss how some say that social media has replaced the desire of drugs for teens today. A Michigan University study recently revealed that in 2015 the percentage of teens using alcohol and drugs reached its lowest point since 1990, and some experts reason that the lack of offline experiences is driving the decrease. The director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse explains: "There may be a protective effect brought about by the fact that they don't have so many occasions to get together where the use of drugs would be facilitated." 

2. Snapchat’s First Filter Game

There is no question that this was Snapchat’s big year, and brands have rushed to engage its young and growing user-base. Sponsored lenses have been a big hit with marketers and users alike, but don’t miss the latest ad offering from the app: Filter Games. After a few tests—and brands like Gatorade and Under Armour creating their own Snap Ads games—Snapchat has hosted its first in-app game, Santa’s Helper, that placed users’ faces into an elf body and allowed them to move their device to steer around a ski slope to collect presents and avoid obstacles. They could then share their scores with friends, encouraging others to play as well.

3. It Takes a Co-Working Space To Raise A Child

As we noted earlier, the new generation of workers are killing traditional…

 
 

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The Newsfeed

“I don't spend money, really on anything. I enjoy video games and will enjoy getting video games, but I receive as gifts from grandparents, parents”—Female, 14, IA

Airbnb is booming in Africa, where young travelers are “looking for culture rather than comfort.” Over two million people have used Airbnb in Africa to book vacation accommodations in the last five years, reportedly earning African hosts $139 million in just the past year. Wanderlusting Millennials are pushing themselves out of their comfort zones to discover new places, rather than retread old ground, and locales like Africa are getting a boost because of it. (Quartz)

Nielsen says they finally have a way to measure Netflix viewership—but Netflix says they’re way off base. Nielsen claims they can keep track of all viewing on the platform, including originals, “whether or not a studio or network wants them to.” Netflix claims, “The data that Nielsen is reporting is not accurate, not even close, and does not reflect the viewing of these shows on Netflix.” Ouch. Regardless, Nielsen’s move is a step in the right direction to measure what The Post-TV Genis watching, and has “direct implications for the ad business.” (MediaPostAdAgeFortune)

Influencers are using Instagram’s new polling feature, beating brands to the punch. Influencer network Blog Lovin’ found that 66% of their followers (many of which are influencers) had already used polling, while 87% plan to in the future. Polling is not only an opportunity to engage with customers but a way for brands to “[ask] for feedback about products, creat[e] engagement around topics that are in the media and [conduct] market research.” But brands have been slow to ask influencers to use the new story feature for promotions or to utilize the feature on their standalone accounts. (Glossy)

High school students are increasingly taking college courses—but little is known about whether it will benefit them. Thanks to dual-enrollment programs, which are expanding rapidly, students can get a head start on college credits, cutting down on the cost of higher education. Some also argue that Advanced Placement courses are more rigorous, and worthier of students’ extra effort. However, the impacts of programs on “a diverse set of students” is not yet known. (WSJ)

Kids have online influencers too, and they’re pushing branded toys to devoted viewers. Unboxing videos on YouTube are not a new phenomenon, but kid stars unboxing toys are getting brands’ attention as a way to leverage The Influencer Effect. MGA Entertainment, the world’s largest private toy company, pivoted 90% of their ad spend to digital in 2014 and report the strategy is paying off. Studies show children’s attention is switching from cable to YouTube, and influencers help brands reach a “much more engaged smaller audience” and give them “that potential for virality.” (Bloomberg)

"I love coffee and love the experience of having someone make me a nice latte. I like being around other people and hanging out in restaurants or cafes.”—Female, 20, PA

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