Happy April Fool’s Day: Recap Of The Web’s Best Jokes & Pranks

If you open up most calendars, you’re not likely to find April 1st listed as an official holiday, but that doesn’t stop most of the western world from celebrating it in one way or another. Though the true origins of the day remain unclear, what IS clear is that cultures throughout history have again and again marked days for hilarity and celebration. Ours is no different!

Though traditionally confined to school classrooms and workplaces, over the past few years Internet culture has taken quite the liking to April Fool’s Day pranks. Often featuring bogus products or outrageous claims, companies and services on the Internet have taken to April Fool’s Day almost as much as they have to Super Bowl commercials.

While you were out pulling pranks with your friends, here are some April Fool’s Day videos you may have missed:

Conan O’Brien Buys Mashable
One of my favorite news sites for startups and social media, Mashable, has been reportedly taken over by Conan O’Brien. Watch the video for his explanations as to why, and be sure to visit Mashable.com soon to check out their “new look.”

Car “Mood Paint” Color
French car company Peugeot shows off their new “Mood Paint” on their latest RCZ. The paint changes with the mood of the driver!

TERII Car Anti-theft
Honda is demonstrating their latest talking gadgetry with this  vehicle theft-deterrent system, featuring “biometric recognition and negotiating tactics to protect against vehicle theft.”

Google Maps 8-bit for NES
Google may take cake this year creating more than seven April 1st product announcements, but this one is easily my favorite. Watch the video, then visit maps.google.com to try it for yourself!

Other 2012 Pranks:
YouTube DVD Collection
Kodak Print Your Own Kittens
Assassin’s Creed for Kinect
Skype For String

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “Next winter I will be going on a solo backpacking trip through Southeast Asia and India. I plan to visit ashrams in India, go hiking and kayaking through SE Asia, try new cuisines, meet locals, and get off the beaten path.” – Female, 26, CO

Last month, we told you we could be seeing the end of the long-standing “sex sells” standby thanks to the “seen it all” generation. Now more research is backing up the idea that sex doesn’t actually sell. Ad testing firm Ameritest asked consumers about Carl’s Jr.’s latest spot featuring a nearly-naked model and found 32% felt worse about the brand after seeing the ad, compared to 8% who feel the same after watching an average fast food commercial. (DigidayAdAge)

A new wave of live streaming apps have been gaining young consumers’ attention—but how are they stacking up against more established social media platforms? Horizon Media’s infographic looks at the state of apps like Meerkat and Periscope, and finds 18-34-year-olds are more likely than older consumers to use them. But while Millennials are also more likely to have heard of these live streaming apps, awareness is still quite low compared to Snapchat, Instagram, and Vine. (Adweek)

The Good Humor man is getting a makeover to appeal to the next generation of ice cream consumers. The brand says they’re changing their trucks to capture the attention of today’s kids, who may be too distracted by devices to hear them coming down the street. In some areas, drivers are being given a more modern dress code, and the now brightly painted trucks’ jingles are being changed to pop hits from artists like Beyoncé and Taylor Swift. (NYPost)

Millennials want to work in tech—specifically for Google. A new report found that tech brands take up the top three spots in the list of places 18-34-year-olds would want to work, with nearly 20% naming Google as their ideal employer, 13% naming Apple, and 9% naming Facebook. Google’s top ranking is fairly unsurprising considering their consistently high marks in employee perks and benefits. (Business Insider)

Emoji are replacing internet slang, infiltrating fashion, and more brands have been creating emoji-centric marketing campaigns in order to appeal to Millennials and teens. Now nonprofit hotline BRIS has launched Abused Emojis, a new emoji alphabet that includes icons for parent drinking, a child being hurt, thinking about death, and other difficult issues. The intention is for kids to use these symbols “to talk about situations where they felt bad or wrongly treated” without having to verbalize their complex problems. (Fast Company)

We give you a dose of insights on young consumers each day, but every quarter, we zoom our lens out to look at some of the larger trends happening with Millennials and teens—and why they matter to brands. Our Gold subscribers have access to the Ypulse Quarterly report, which synthesizes the major trends and stats we’ve seen over the last quarter of the year. We take a close look at the "why behind the what" of big shifts and provide in-action examples and supportive data, along with implications for you to take away. (Ypulse)

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