Halloween Provides A Glimpse Into The Top Millennial Trends

Halloween isn’t just a chance to dress up, eat lots of candy, and watch scary movies. It’s a major time for marketers to understand consumers who are expected to spend $8 billion on the holiday this year. Besides tricks and treats, Halloween provides perspective on some of the biggest trends...just take a look at what people are dressing up as and how they get their costume ideas. So in the spirit of Halloween, we spoke to more than 700 Millennials about their Halloween outfits and inspiration, and many of our findings offer insights to further understand this generation.

WaldoThe ‘90s Are All That

It’s no secret that Millennials are nostalgic for the ‘90s, but Halloween highlights just how much they miss this decade and the simpler times that it represents. Many Millennials mentioned that they dressed up/are dressing up as iconic characters from ‘90s TV shows, books, video games, and even board games because these characters and objects are meaningful to them. For example, one Millennial told us that she dressed as Ms. Frizzle from the books and show “The Magic School Bus” because she loved the series growing up and still thinks it’s awesome. Another said he dressed as Chuckie from “Rugrats” because he too enjoyed it as a kid and still does thanks to reruns. Another Millennial said she's being a character from Candy Land, which is particularly relevant with the resurgence of board games. Numerous other young people mentioned that they're dressing as Pokeman, Mario (from Super Mario Bros.), Waldo, the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, and the always popular Disney princesses. As many of these characters are coming back through reboots or the wave of ‘90s nostalgia taking culture by storm, Millennials are very much excited and want to show their enthusiasm for this period.

Revenge of the…

 
 

Want to talk to us about the article
or dive into a custom study?


Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “My favorite store to shop in is The Apple Store. Best store layout i have every experienced. They have the products I want and the expertise to answer any questions.” –Male, 19, VA

Those fretting about the "dating apocalypse" are missing a lot, but it's true that dating in the digital age is full of complications for young consumers. While some truly believe that so-called hookup culture is the problem, there is another theory out there for the modern dating scene’s issues: math. The book DATE-ONOMICS: How Dating Became a Lopsided Numbers Game argues that hookup culture is actually a result of unequal numbers in the gender pool. In short, far more women are going to college, and “when gender ratios skew toward women, as they do today among college grads, the dating culture becomes more sexualized.” (Washington Post)

Every parent who has asked, “What were they thinking?!” when they see teens’ questionable social media posts finally has an answer: nothing. Ask.fm’s recent survey found that 80% of teens post status updates, or send tweets without thinking about the consequences of what they’re broadcasting. But many of their parents don’t actually know what’s being posted anyway: 43% say they don’t keep tabs on their children’s online activity. (Jezebel)

When Millennials get over their wariness of the stock market and actually do invest, they still aren’t making the same choices their parents did. Younger investors favor “passive management,” and tend to choose less volatile stocks. Unsurprisingly, their tech-reliance is also influencing their investments, and they're using online wealth management tools and “robo-advisors,” while Boomers still rely on information from peers, traditional brokers, and financial advisors. (Nasdaq)

According to a recent Ypulse monthly survey, 91% of 13-32-year-olds say they care about their health and being healthy, and 73% say they enjoy exercising—so it makes sense that it’s young consumers who are spending on health and wellness products. Another recent study found that one in three Millennials share health content through social media, texts, or email every week. Their fitness behavior is driving the growth in health tech: health and wellness apps have seen 171% annual growth in usage. (MediaPost)

We’ve told you about the unique and wonderful talents of YouTuber Todrick Hall in the past, but in case you missed that, Fast Company has a “Non-Millennials’ Guide” to Hall—because he’s now got his own show on MTV. Todrick, which premieres tonight, is a reality show that gives viewers a behind-the-scenes look at Hall and his creative crew making their musical online videos. The singer's YouTube channel currently has over 1.6 million followers. (Fast Company)

Quote of the Day: "My favorite place to shop online is Sephora, because I love high end makeup and I love reading about what's new and watching tutorials on how it works.” –Female, 26, MA

Sign Up Now

Subscribe for premium access to our content, data, and tools.

Already a subscriber? Sign in.

Upgrade Now

Upgrade for full access to the best marketing tools for understanding the next generation.

View our Client Case Studies