Halloween Provides A Glimpse Into The Top Millennial Trends

Halloween isn’t just a chance to dress up, eat lots of candy, and watch scary movies. It’s a major time for marketers to understand consumers who are expected to spend $8 billion on the holiday this year. Besides tricks and treats, Halloween provides perspective on some of the biggest trends...just take a look at what people are dressing up as and how they get their costume ideas. So in the spirit of Halloween, we spoke to more than 700 Millennials about their Halloween outfits and inspiration, and many of our findings offer insights to further understand this generation.

WaldoThe ‘90s Are All That

It’s no secret that Millennials are nostalgic for the ‘90s, but Halloween highlights just how much they miss this decade and the simpler times that it represents. Many Millennials mentioned that they dressed up/are dressing up as iconic characters from ‘90s TV shows, books, video games, and even board games because these characters and objects are meaningful to them. For example, one Millennial told us that she dressed as Ms. Frizzle from the books and show “The Magic School Bus” because she loved the series growing up and still thinks it’s awesome. Another said he dressed as Chuckie from “Rugrats” because he too enjoyed it as a kid and still does thanks to reruns. Another Millennial said she's being a character from Candy Land, which is particularly relevant with the resurgence of board games. Numerous other young people mentioned that they're dressing as Pokeman, Mario (from Super Mario Bros.), Waldo, the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, and the always popular Disney princesses. As many of these characters are coming back through reboots or the wave of ‘90s nostalgia taking culture by storm, Millennials are very much excited and want to show their enthusiasm for this period.

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “For Halloween, I’m dressing as Angelica from Hamilton (dress in period clothing and write unsatisfied across my chest).”—Female, 26, MA

Amazon is on track to take over the apparel industry. Their clothing and accessory sales are expected to grow by 30% next year, surpassing Macy’s apparel sales to make them “the biggest apparel seller in the U.S.,” according to a new report from Cowen & Co. The site has ramped up fashion efforts in recent years by launching private label brands, and sponsoring fashion week. Although respondents in a recent shopper survey did not rate Amazon Fashion highly in “site personalization and ease of use," they did mention the convenience and free two-day shipping of Amazon Prime as the biggest draw. (Business Insider)

In just 15 months, Tasty has not only become the driving force behind BuzzFeed video, it has also become one of top three publishing brands on Facebook. According to an analysis by Tubular Labs, in the last three months Tasty’s Facebook videos averaged 22.8 million video views in just the first 30 days, while BuzzFeed’s main Facebook page only averaged 4.7 million in the same timespan. Known for their “overhead shots of hands assembling delicious, bizarre and everything-in-between recipes,” the brand has recently expanded to include celebrity chefs in the mix. (Digiday

Millennials’ desire for convenience is leading the food delivery revolution. According to Mintel, Americans are increasingly choosing to order in than go out, and 45% of U.S. adults have ordered food delivery in the past three months. That percentage increases to 69% among 18-34-year-old males who live in urban areas, with Millennial women not too far behind at 58%. Among all respondents, the top reasons for ordering in were to catch up on TV shows and movies (41%) and eating alone (25%). (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

Bordeaux is releasing a new video series to make itself seem approachable and less stuffy to young drinkers. Beyond Bordeaux is a 10-episode YouTube series where the founder of a food magazine visits the best BYOB restaurants to drink Bordeaux wine at, from “neighborhood pizza places in New York to taco joints in L.A. to sushi spots in Chicago.” The brand wants to shed its exclusive and expensive image, and show Millennials their wine can be fun, affordable, and accessible. (Adweek)

Disney and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art are pairing fairytales and fine art for a “fresh” Snapchat campaign. In bi-monthly stories that will be featured on both Disney’s and LACMA’s accounts, the duo will visually retell classics like Beauty and the Beast using works of art and hand-drawn overlays. Disney calls the partnership, “a natural way to add a little magic to art and storytelling to reach a new generation of art and Disney fans alike." LACMA has been using Snapchat since 2014 to playfully highlight and spread awareness of their artwork, winning a Webby for their efforts. (Ad Age)   

Quote of the Day: “For me being an adult means being entirely independent. I pay my own bills, make all decisions in my life, and feel very in control.”—Male, 20, NY

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