Guest Post: Meet the Mipsterz

Millennials are the most global generation to date, with unprecedented internationally shared culture points and access to information about their peers around the world. While there are absolutely still distinctions within the generation depending on region, we do see amazing commonalities among them as well, and a desire among young Millennials around the world to balance their local, traditional culture with a more forward-thinking worldview. Today we are giving you an exclusive first look at JWT MENA’s newest report on Mipsterz, a growing group of young, hip, and mostly female Muslims who are forging new ground in integrating tradition and modern life—a very Millennial approach to the world we touched upon in our own Splice of Life trend last year.

The “Mipsterz” Evolution: Where Are They and What Are They Thinking?

If you haven’t come across the term Mipsterz yet, you need to catch up and fast.  This global Gen Y [Millennial] sub-culture is specifically Muslim, but fused with hipster values. Born out of conflict and misperception in the West, Mipsterz project an entirely new image of Islam to their communities and the media and it’s not what you have come to expect. The In the Name of Faith and Fun report from JWT MENA Brand Intelligence sheds light on their unique motivations, challenges and expectations from society, brands and the world. At their core, Mipsterz will not compromise the requirements of their faith, but they do so with a joie de vivre and desire to integrate fully within society.  

The report’s insights show they are affirmed pacifists, with 89% asserting the rejection of violence; and they are highly educated: 40% have acquired a college degree education or higher.


It is easy to make the connection as to how this intellectually provocative social…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “My favorite store to shop in is The Apple Store. Best store layout i have every experienced. They have the products I want and the expertise to answer any questions.” –Male, 19, VA

Those fretting about the "dating apocalypse" are missing a lot, but it's true that dating in the digital age is full of complications for young consumers. While some truly believe that so-called hookup culture is the problem, there is another theory out there for the modern dating scene’s issues: math. The book DATE-ONOMICS: How Dating Became a Lopsided Numbers Game argues that hookup culture is actually a result of unequal numbers in the gender pool. In short, far more women are going to college, and “when gender ratios skew toward women, as they do today among college grads, the dating culture becomes more sexualized.” (Washington Post)

Every parent who has asked, “What were they thinking?!” when they see teens’ questionable social media posts finally has an answer: nothing. Ask.fm’s recent survey found that 80% of teens post status updates, or send tweets without thinking about the consequences of what they’re broadcasting. But many of their parents don’t actually know what’s being posted anyway: 43% say they don’t keep tabs on their children’s online activity. (Jezebel)

When Millennials get over their wariness of the stock market and actually do invest, they still aren’t making the same choices their parents did. Younger investors favor “passive management,” and tend to choose less volatile stocks. Unsurprisingly, their tech-reliance is also influencing their investments, and they're using online wealth management tools and “robo-advisors,” while Boomers still rely on information from peers, traditional brokers, and financial advisors. (Nasdaq)

According to a recent Ypulse monthly survey, 91% of 13-32-year-olds say they care about their health and being healthy, and 73% say they enjoy exercising—so it makes sense that it’s young consumers who are spending on health and wellness products. Another recent study found that one in three Millennials share health content through social media, texts, or email every week. Their fitness behavior is driving the growth in health tech: health and wellness apps have seen 171% annual growth in usage. (MediaPost)

We’ve told you about the unique and wonderful talents of YouTuber Todrick Hall in the past, but in case you missed that, Fast Company has a “Non-Millennials’ Guide” to Hall—because he’s now got his own show on MTV. Todrick, which premieres tonight, is a reality show that gives viewers a behind-the-scenes look at Hall and his creative crew making their musical online videos. The singer's YouTube channel currently has over 1.6 million followers. (Fast Company)

Quote of the Day: "My favorite place to shop online is Sephora, because I love high end makeup and I love reading about what's new and watching tutorials on how it works.” –Female, 26, MA

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