Gen Y Shares Their Thanksgiving Plans And What They’re Grateful For This Year

It’s almost Thanksgiving and Millennials can’t contain their excitement! We checked in with 538 13-34-year-olds the past few days to hear how they’ll be celebrating the holiday, as well as what they’re most thankful for this year. And as to be expected, they’re grateful for a lot, most notably their family and friends who are their support system. They’re eager to celebrate the holiday, which is a favorite for many, both because they get to spend time with their loved ones and because of the food. The ways in which they spend the holiday, the traditions they participate in, and what they’ll be giving thanks for this year provides insights into this generation and what they value the most.

Millennials are extremely close with their family, so it makes sense that they’re most thankful for them. Unlike previous generations, young people view their parents as close friends, and because of that, they like hanging out with their parents (perhaps in moderation though!) In today’s economy, it’s quite common for young people to move back home with their parents, so Millennials are more appreciative than ever of their Mom and Dad’s help, both emotionally and financially. Several “boomerang” Millennials mentioned that they’re glad to have gotten closer to their parents since returning to their childhood home, highlighting a trend wherein parents and kids continue to become closer. Their parents have believed in them and made them feel special their whole lives, and Millennials are appreciative to have their parents as pals. Gen Y is also grateful for their extended family, including their grandparents, aunts, and uncles, and many are excited about the holiday because they will get to see these loved ones.

It’s no surprise that friends are also extremely important to Millennials who do…

 
 

Want to talk to us about the article
or dive into a custom study?


Millennial News Feed

“The issue I am most passionate about is jobs/unemployment, because I need a job.”

—Female, 24, OH

Half of all 13-17-year-olds are on Snapchat, according to Ypulse’s most recent social media tracker—so what are they really doing on there? One BuzzFeed writer observed his 13-year-old sister to find out how to “Snapchat like the teens,” and learned that the “app is [her] life.” She wakes up every morning to respond to about 40 incoming snaps with selfies, which she can do in under a minute. Responding is crucial, streaks (responding every day without a break) are “the MOST important thing,” filters are “VERY big,” and “EVERYONE looks at Cosmo on Discover.” When asked about her dad’s reaction to her incessant snapping she answered: “Parents don’t understand. It’s about being there in the moment.” (BuzzFeed

The Tab, a student-targeted site with articles on campus life and local stories, is not ready to let go of their 2.5 million monthly readers preparing to graduate—so they’ve expanded. The Tab National is targeting for 20-somethings, and describes itself as as “the Vice for people who don’t think that Uber or pop-up markets are necessarily a bad thing.” The Tab’s top-tier U.S. and U.K. university sites have captivated advertisers, who are guaranteed that their sponsored posts will get at least 25,000 page views—more than half of brand stories on the site are getting 50,000. (Digiday

You may have heard that Twitter is reworking their timeline algorithm, but what does that mean for brands? The new layout will use an algorithm to showcase the most relevant tweets, and “collated tweets from brands, athletes, politicians and other public figures will appear at the top of the timeline” so users won’t miss any trending conversations. For brands this means well-thought out content will still be key as “[t]he algorithm will likely favor content with higher engagement.” It could also mean more exposure: “organic posts [will] have the ability to drive enormous engagement and cause a buzz.” (The Drum

According to Pew’s new data, Millennial Democrats are far more likely than older generations and their Republican peers to get their political updates through social media, with 74% who are very likely going to participate in their state’s primary or caucus saying they learned about the election through a social site, compared to 50% of Millennial Republicans. Millennial Democrats are also the most likely to identify themselves as liberal: in 2015, half (49%) labeled themselves as liberals, compared to 41% of Gen X, 40%(of Boomer, and 35% of Silent Democrats. (Pew Research Center)

Luxury menswear brand John Varavatos’s shoppable, touchable video ad powered by Cinematique prompted eight times more Facebook engagement than standard videos. Viewers can click or tap clothing like as the video plays, and at the end of the ad are shown the collection they chose, leading to product pages on the website. According to recent data, 33% of fashion video are considered mainly “brand-building,” and only 16% of brands use shoppable videos. But that could shift as more marketers adjust to consumers’ video-consumption behaviors. (WWDDigiday)

Quote of the Day: “I participated in Bikram Yoga, because I found a few YouTube tutorials on it.” –Female, 24, MN

Sign Up Now

Subscribe for premium access to our content, data, and tools.

Already a subscriber? Sign in.

Upgrade Now

Upgrade for full access to the best marketing tools for understanding the next generation.

View our Client Case Studies