Forget Me Not: The Future of Passwords

Privacy in the digital age has been a hot-button topic for some time now, and as we touched upon in last week’s look at the Rise of Paranoia Apps, fear and paranoia seems to have reached a fever pitch through technology. The recent NSA scandal has Millennials, along with all consumers, reflecting on digital privacy and protection. The generation known for sharing everything cares more about privacy than previously assumed. They may not be able to stop government eavesdropping, but we already know that many Millennials are incredibly savvy about protecting their privacy online from parents, teachers and employers. As concerns about privacy grow, we can expect that they will develop and find more intense ways to keep outsiders out of their digital content. We can also expect that privacy concerns will increasingly be focused on their mobile devices, as they rely on them more, and as a rising amount of their personal data is stored on smartphones and tablets. Not surprisingly, in this culture of fear and digital protection obsession, we have noticed a fascination with new and futuristic-sounding concepts for password protection. It could be that very soon finger swipes and four digit pass-codes will be considered antiquated ways of protecting the wealth of data in your phone. In fact, passwords are so troubling to consumers (too many to remember, annoying rules to keep track of) that the future of passwords may be not having passwords at all. Here are a few of the ways password/authentication technology could be amped up in the near future.
 

1. Expression Unlock: Google’s facial recognition technology Face Unlock was initially praised and then criticized upon release for its ability to be too easily hacked with a photo of the person. But advances in the technology are already on the…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day:  “Young and Hungry are short 30 minute shows, so I can watch it on my lunch breaks at work. I like the humor and the characters. The story line is easy to follow. It's an easy show to binge watch.”—Female, 20, WS

Following Gatorade’s lead, Under Armour has added their own sponsored game to Snapchat. By swiping up on the brand’s 10-second ad, users can play “It Comes From Below,” an “endless runner” game featuring NFL star Cam Newton dodging obstacles like trees and wolves. The game also allows players to snap and send their scores to friends, along with a prompt to play themselves. Under Armour hopes to reach the 14-22-year-old high school and college athletes using the platform. (Adweek)

Coach is scrapping its mobile app to focus on chat instead. Deeming the app “no longer viable,” the luxury brand is shifting from convincing young consumers to come to their platform to going to where they already are, as part of their “ongoing comeback plan.” The new interactive Coachmoji iMessage keyboard can be used to create sharable mood boards depicting themes from their Spring 2017 collection. In the two weeks since the keyboard’s launch, daily engagement has reportedly already surpassed their former app. (Glossy)

The Obama administration is trying new and aggressive approaches to get young adults to sign up for health insurance. Less than 30% of the 13 million people who have signed up for coverage under the Affordable Care Act so far have been 18-34-year-olds—a group critical to the law’s success. To reach uninsured under-35-year-olds, the administration plans to advertise on video platform Twitch, and social networks like Facebook, Snapchat, and Tumblr. The campaign will revolve around the hashtag #HeavyAdulting and focus on medical issues most relevant to the group, like reproductive health. (The Wall Street Journal)

Family-friendly brands are creating content for Mattel’s updated View-Master toy. The Littlstar Family app—which can be uploaded on to an Apple or Android and then used along with Mattel’s virtual reality and 360-degree capable View-Master—will feature an extensive library of content from National Geographic, Disney, Bento Box Entertainment and Discovery Channel. Focused on immersive, Mattel also plans to launch a VR Batman experience for the toy this fall(Kidscreen

General Motors is going after experience-hungry young consumers who would rather share a car than own one. Their new start-up brand Maven offers a car sharing service that can paid for by the hour or day (no membership fee) and will be “rolling out city-by-city.” To market the new service, the brand sought out “local experts and connoisseurs” to tell stories that will “bring new cities to life.” An additional Maven service that will offer rides to airports will also be launched soon. (Ad Age)  

Quote of the Day: "My favorite show is New Girl  because it makes me feel like I'm hanging out with my friends. It's so funny, relatable, and relaxed. It's also convenient to watch for free on the Fox website.”—Female, 20, IL

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