Flash Robs: Teens Organize Negative Actions On Social Media

Today’s post comes from Ypulse’s Research Intern Phil Savarese.

Flash Robs: Teens Organize Negative Actions On Social Media

Millennials always want to be a part of something much bigger than themselves and the popularity of flash mobs is evidence to that. Social media makes it easier to orchestrate large events out of thin air and being part of a large group takes away the fear of being self-conscious to cut loose. A recent Lifeline quote stated: “Flash mobs are a big trend because it's easier to be crazy in a large group with a small amount of anonymity.” (Female, 25, FL).

But with the popularity and mass appeal of flash mobs, a sub-culture has emerged. Flash robs are a mischievous and dangerous type of flash mob, where participants (usually teens) gather at retail stores among other places and rush inside. Once there, they proceed to grab as much as they can and leave as quickly as possible. In and out.

Over the past few years, flash robs have become more common. Store owners are worried for the safety of both their customers and their stores profits. CBS New York reported on a wave of flash robs that have targeted various newsstands and convenience stores. One shop owner has been targeted a total seven times. In recent attacks, an employee was struck with a bottle and hospitalized while another left a customer with a broken arm. 

In 2011, the robberies got the attention of Washington state legislators. The Wall Street Journal reported that Senator Mike Carroll proposed a law that will classify a flash rob as organized retail theft (a felony) if nine or more individuals planned the crime using electronic messages and collectively steal $250 (previously $750) or more. Other legislators are worried that the decrease in the minimum amount stolen will cause the…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I follow the news because I want to be aware of the world.” –Female, 15, OH

Today in “food chains trying to appeal to young consumers” news: TGI Fridays is trying to “woo Gen Y" with free burgers and pay-it-forward marketing. Customers who buy a burger will get a code they can use to share a free burger with a friend via social media or email. The digital campaign is designed to draw in Millennials, who Friday’s CEO notes need "something worthy of a conversation” to interest them. (MediaPost)

Native advertising is still controversial, and some believe truly misleading, but a recent study finds younger readers are “significantly less likely to feel deceived by native ads.” Twenty percent of 18-24-year-olds and 15% of 25-34-year-olds actually say they feel more positive about brands that have native ads. Growing up with branded content is likely influencing their more positive POV, but Ypulse research has also found that 82% say “everything I see or read I take with a grain of salt.” (Skyword)

Think Millennials are lazy? What if we told you they don’t even stop working when they’re on vacation? A new survey reports that 35% of Millennials say they work every day of their vacations, and feel less productive when they get back. It’s clear that entering the workplace at a time when they are always accessible via mobile has made an impact. (Time)

Minecraft is hugely popular with young consumers, its influence is growing, and the game is spawning a new kind of celebrity. The Minecon convention in London over July 4th weekend was the largest ever event for a single video game, selling 100,000 tickets. The convention featured Minecraft players with millions of followers, who signed autographs, took pictures with fans, and enjoyed a new era of fame. (Business Insider)

Young consumers might be more willing to give out their data online, but beware: they “will ditch brands” that use it to spam them. Millennials are reportedly 44% more likely than Xers and Boomers to fall into the “sensitive consumer” bracket, and research has found that if annoyed by marketing, 80% of Millennials will block cold callers, 84% will unsubscribe from emails or close accounts, and 82% will delete apps. (Marketing Magazine)

Quote of the Day: "I follow the news so I can make fun of the GOP presidential candidates..." -Male, 30, KN 

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