Five Things to Know in Music/TV/Movies Now


1. Frozen is still very hot.
In case you missed it, Disney’s Frozen is more than a movie, it has already become a major Disney franchise and is currently having a big cultural moment. As of today, Frozen has earned over $669 million in the box office globally, making it the second highest grossing Disney Animated film of all time, after The Lion King. Meanwhile, the soundtrack has reached No.1 on the Billboard 200, and the ballad “Let It Go”—the pop version of which is sung by Demi Lovato—is reportedly resonating with tweens in a big way. It has already been announced that the film will be turned into a Disney Broadway musical, news that Billboard calls, ”yet another sign that Disney is no longer in the shadow of animation rival Pixar,” so be prepared for Frozen to stay in the spotlight and continue to be a part of the tween, young Millennial, and Plural world for some time. 

2. Girls is on YouTube
HBO is bucking their long-standing trend of keeping their content to themselves and posting the first episodes of Girls season 3 on YouTube for all to see, just 12 hours after their original broadcast. Telling Mashable that, “For us, this is an increasingly challenging demographic to reach with traditional means,” the network is experimenting with social media to reach out to younger viewers. The show has also been given a Snapchat account, which sends out images that act as inside jokes to fans, behind the scenes info, and sneak peaks of episodes. Those fleeting snaps are also being turned into GIFs to be shared on other networks whose missives have longer staying power. 

3. Music fests could be deflating.
In the last decade the music festival industry has exploded, as small festivals have condensed into fewer mega-fests like Coachella, and festivals have become not just major business,…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I want to do the Trans-Siberian Railroad trip from Russia to China to experience diverse cultures in one ride.”

—Female, 30, Maine

Beauty aisles are undergoing "Sephorization" to cater to skeptical Millennials. The beauty industry is expected to grow to $51.8 billion in 2020, and women 18-34-year-olds are currently the largest portion of the cosmetic market, purchasing 10 types of products a year. The age group is a “suspicious crew,” opting to go in-store and signing up for sample box services instead of risking buying online. In response, retailers are rushing to offer consumers the chance to try before they buy. Target has created their own beauty trial box offering, and some online beauty brands are establishing brick-and-mortar locations. (Racked)

Elon Musk, founder of Tesla Motors and SpaceX, has struck a chord with Millennials. In a global survey of twenty-somethings, the iconic entrepreneur came in third as the public figure young adults most admire, behind Nelson Mandela and Pope Francis. His career perspective resonates with Millennials who “are willing to make less and take on more stress for the opportunity to help build part of that tomorrow.” Transparency and tangible goals are also at play: Musk’s social media feed highlights SpaceX's accomplishments, giving followers a look “behind the curtains of his companies.” (Inc.

Purpose-seeking Millennials have begun skipping beach getaways for social-impact vacations. After Carnival Cruise Line’s research showed that consumers had a “hunger for purpose,” the brand launched Fathom, a cruise where passengers can “partake in on-the-ground ‘impact’ activities such as making ceramic water filters in the Dominican Republic.” Breakout, “a leading company in what’s known as the social-impact travel industry,” has also gained traction, offering professionals 29-36-years-old an opportunity to network with peers in different cities and brainstorm ways to do good. (Bloomberg)  

Teens are spending almost nine hours a day consuming media on phones, computers, and tablets—double the amount of time the average American spends on their phone. A 2015 study from Common Sense Media has revealed that most of teens’ waking hours are spent staring at screens, which one integrative psychiatrist says could lead to “electronic screen syndrome,” or "sensory overload, lack of restorative sleep, and a hyperaroused nervous system." The data also found that kids from eight-12-years-old are spending almost six hours a day looking at screens. (Tech Insider

Angry Birds has taken over McDonald’s. Rovio, the entertainment company behind the movie, teamed up with the fast food giant and Sony to create a 360-degree video that places the audience within a McDonald’s location where the characters from the film fly around tables and interact with dining families, combining “animation with reality.” The spot garnered 4.5 million views in less than a week. This is the first time 360-video has been used in a fast food restaurant setting, but McDonald’s second venture into VR counting their Happy Meal activation. (Adweek

Quote of the Day: The emoji I most send is 100, because I'm 100% real.”—Male, 15, TX

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