Five Things to Know in Music/TV/Movies Now


1. Frozen is still very hot.
In case you missed it, Disney’s Frozen is more than a movie, it has already become a major Disney franchise and is currently having a big cultural moment. As of today, Frozen has earned over $669 million in the box office globally, making it the second highest grossing Disney Animated film of all time, after The Lion King. Meanwhile, the soundtrack has reached No.1 on the Billboard 200, and the ballad “Let It Go”—the pop version of which is sung by Demi Lovato—is reportedly resonating with tweens in a big way. It has already been announced that the film will be turned into a Disney Broadway musical, news that Billboard calls, ”yet another sign that Disney is no longer in the shadow of animation rival Pixar,” so be prepared for Frozen to stay in the spotlight and continue to be a part of the tween, young Millennial, and Plural world for some time. 

2. Girls is on YouTube
HBO is bucking their long-standing trend of keeping their content to themselves and posting the first episodes of Girls season 3 on YouTube for all to see, just 12 hours after their original broadcast. Telling Mashable that, “For us, this is an increasingly challenging demographic to reach with traditional means,” the network is experimenting with social media to reach out to younger viewers. The show has also been given a Snapchat account, which sends out images that act as inside jokes to fans, behind the scenes info, and sneak peaks of episodes. Those fleeting snaps are also being turned into GIFs to be shared on other networks whose missives have longer staying power. 

3. Music fests could be deflating.
In the last decade the music festival industry has exploded, as small festivals have condensed into fewer mega-fests like Coachella, and festivals have become not just major business,…

 
 

Want to talk to us about the article
or dive into a custom study?


The Newsfeed

Quote of the Day: “A wedding trend I’ve noticed recently is guests not dressing formally to the reception/wedding, more come as you are attitude.”—Female, 24, MI

This week, Mattel introduced an American Boy doll, their first male offering in the company’s 31-year history. New doll Logan Everett is part of a pair of singer-songwriters from Nashville who come with music-inspired accessories. The company reports that customers have been asking for a male doll for some time, and Mattel’s continuing strategy to diversify their offerings helped increase sales by 4% last year. (KidscreenNYTimes

Kids in Australia are spending more time online than watching TV. Research firm Roy Morgan reports that in 2016 six-13-year-olds spent an average of 12 hours a week online compared to 10.5 hours spent in front of the TV, the first time internet surpassed TV since the survey began in 2008. Online time has also almost doubled in the last eight years. The firm says, "The idea that TV is boring no matter what is on is just because TV is so static and it might have ads on it." (ABC

The current state of the White House has ignited Gen Z’s interest in politics—according to AwesomenessTV’s CEO, Brian Robbins. He reports that his own children’s newfound fascination with politics sparked by the recent election has inspired him to bring more political content to AwesomenessTV. Because “[a]n audience that really wasn't that interested is now really interested," the company will move away from “fluffy, horrible” entertainment news into political news, which could be in the form of documentaries, or scripted shows. (Business Insider)

Millennials are reporting higher rates of depression than any other generation, creating challenges at work. To avoid the stigma surrounding mental issues, young employees are increasingly resorting to using personal days to recuperate from anxiety, depression, and other afflictions. According to one expert, “this generation is not necessarily more depressed than workers of past generations, but more equipped to recognize it”—however, they fear judgement from their employers. (MarketWatch)  

Is Snap Inc. really a camera company? They say they are, and in their IPO filing the brand wrote, “In the way that the flashing cursor became the starting point for most products on desktop computers, we believe that the camera screen will be the starting point for most products on smartphones.” WeChat’s ability to read QR codes, Pinterest’s new visual search, and Facebook Messengers’ new visual capabilities all point to expanding capabilities of a camera—and the fact that “users’ experience of the world is increasingly mediated through cameras.” (The New Yorker)  

Quote of the Day: “I have a diamond wedding ring but any stone would be beautiful and appreciated.”—Female, 24, MN

Sign Up Now

Subscribe for premium access to our content, data, and tools.

Already a subscriber? Sign in.

Upgrade Now

Upgrade for full access to the best marketing tools for understanding the next generation.

View our Client Case Studies