“Fat Kid Rules The World” Challenges Viewers And The Mainstream Film Industry

"Fat Kid Rules The World" is a movie outside the Hollywood norm, not only because it stars an overweight punk teen, but also because it's reinventing the models of distribution using social media.

Fat Kid Rules The World

We were at Rooftop Films Friday night to check out the first New York City screening of “Fat Kid Rules The World,” the film adaptation of KL Going’s YA novel of the same name and Matthew Lillard’s directorial debut. The film has been a decade in the making and well worth the wait.

The story of an overweight, depressed teenager who figures out where he belongs when he discovers punk music still resonates with this generation of young people. If anything, it’s even more poignant as many teens struggle with fitting in and music is an ever-more-important factor in their lives and forming friendships. The film, like the book, doesn’t shy away from controversial topics, from drug use to suicide to complicated friendships and family relationships.

Following the screening, Lillard explained that he got involved with the film project while recording the book on tape — he was moved by the story because, like the main character, he was a lost kid in high school until he discovered acting. He immediately contacted Going and bought the film rights. After the film took home the Audience Award at SXSW, the opportunities that Hollywood presented were “kinda crappy,” according to Lillard. The Hollywood system doesn’t see a film about a fat kid as a big money maker, so Lillard and his crew are teaming up with Tugg.com — a sort of Groupon for films — to distribute the film.

At the screening, we talked with Lillard and Rick Rosenthal, the film’s producer, about why they chose to make this story, how social media is changing the film industry, and why they turned to Kickstarter to raise funds to get the film to theaters. [They’re currently a mere $16,000 away from reaching their goal with just four days left!]

The Fat Kid Family — Rick Rosenthal, Noah Rosenthal, KL Going, Julian Gavilanes, Dylan Arnold, Jacob Wysocki, and Matthew LillardYpulse: It’s clear from the group here supporting the film and from the number of…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: "My favorite show is New Girl  because it makes me feel like I'm hanging out with my friends. It's so funny, relatable, and relaxed. It's also convenient to watch for free on the Fox website.”—Female, 20, IL

Millennials would rather lose their ability to make phone calls than delete their Snapchat—according to a new study from live chat provider LivePerson. When asked about the one app they would not want to lose on their phones, 35% of 18-24-year-olds chose text, 17% chose Snapchat, and 14% chose phone. According to a 2013 Wall Street Journal article, picking up the phone is seen more as “an interruption” by the generation, and our Talk the Talk trend revealed that 38% of 13-33-year-olds prefer to communicate with friends and family with text messages and chat apps. (Business Insider)  

Today’s young females are facing the same obstacles at work their mothers did. A McKinsey & Co. and LeanIn.Org study found that 23% of employed Millennial women believe “their gender has prevented them from getting ahead at work”—only 3% less than older females. And while younger female workers are more ambitious than older women, “the difference between the share of men and women saying they want to be a top executive” is almost the same among Millennials and older employees. Many Millennial females are taking non-traditional employment paths like to take control of their career paths and advance quicker. (The Wall Street Journal

What are Millennials spending their money on? Coffee, kale, fantasy football, and strippers. An analysis of mobile payments made on Venmo found the top spending categories among users—many 18-34-years-old—are food, rent, alcohol, “fun,” and coffee. Pizza was the most-used emoji and food was the most-used term, followed by Uber, rent, "fantasy" and bills. Kale ranked at 21 on the top 100 list, and strippers were number 91. Venmo processed around $4 billion in peer-to-peer payments in the second quarter of this year, up 141% from 2015. (CNBC

Samsung is the most respected brand among Millennials in the U.S., and they’re aiming to continually “[raise] the bar for technology innovation.” Focused on creating an experience, the brand is leading the way in virtual reality technology, with plans to “to incorporate gesture and motion tracking enabling users to interact in virtual environments without having to use a controller.” They’ve worked on VR projects with VICE, and recently staged an interactive VR experience at Lollapolooza, which allowed festival attendees to livestream performances and try out 4D surfing, skateboarding, hot air ballooning, and riding a roller coaster. (brandchannel

Immensely popular collectibles Shopkins toys will soon be on the small screen with their first ever movie. Moose Toys has teamed up with Universal Pictures for Shopkins: Chef Club, a direct-to-video movie that will be out next month. The story will feature fan-favorite characters, as well as new ones that will be added to the Shoppies Dolls collection to coincide with the movie’s release. Shopkins currently has 140 different collectable toy characters and an animated webisode series that has generated almost 100 million views on YouTube. (Kidscreen

Quote of the Day: “Master of None represents my generation because it takes the little things (going to a taco place) and expands on how the choices are debilitating.”—Female, 33, MN

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