“Fat Kid Rules The World” Challenges Viewers And The Mainstream Film Industry

"Fat Kid Rules The World" is a movie outside the Hollywood norm, not only because it stars an overweight punk teen, but also because it's reinventing the models of distribution using social media.

Fat Kid Rules The World

We were at Rooftop Films Friday night to check out the first New York City screening of “Fat Kid Rules The World,” the film adaptation of KL Going’s YA novel of the same name and Matthew Lillard’s directorial debut. The film has been a decade in the making and well worth the wait.

The story of an overweight, depressed teenager who figures out where he belongs when he discovers punk music still resonates with this generation of young people. If anything, it’s even more poignant as many teens struggle with fitting in and music is an ever-more-important factor in their lives and forming friendships. The film, like the book, doesn’t shy away from controversial topics, from drug use to suicide to complicated friendships and family relationships.

Following the screening, Lillard explained that he got involved with the film project while recording the book on tape — he was moved by the story because, like the main character, he was a lost kid in high school until he discovered acting. He immediately contacted Going and bought the film rights. After the film took home the Audience Award at SXSW, the opportunities that Hollywood presented were “kinda crappy,” according to Lillard. The Hollywood system doesn’t see a film about a fat kid as a big money maker, so Lillard and his crew are teaming up with Tugg.com — a sort of Groupon for films — to distribute the film.

At the screening, we talked with Lillard and Rick Rosenthal, the film’s producer, about why they chose to make this story, how social media is changing the film industry, and why they turned to Kickstarter to raise funds to get the film to theaters. [They’re currently a mere $16,000 away from reaching their goal with just four days left!]

The Fat Kid Family — Rick Rosenthal, Noah Rosenthal, KL Going, Julian Gavilanes, Dylan Arnold, Jacob Wysocki, and Matthew LillardYpulse: It’s clear from the group here supporting the film and from the number of…

 
 

Want to talk to us about the article
or dive into a custom study?


Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I follow the news because I want to be aware of the world.” –Female, 15, OH

Today in “food chains trying to appeal to young consumers” news: TGI Fridays is trying to “woo Gen Y" with free burgers and pay-it-forward marketing. Customers who buy a burger will get a code they can use to share a free burger with a friend via social media or email. The digital campaign is designed to draw in Millennials, who Friday’s CEO notes need "something worthy of a conversation” to interest them. (MediaPost)

Native advertising is still controversial, and some believe truly misleading, but a recent study finds younger readers are “significantly less likely to feel deceived by native ads.” Twenty percent of 18-24-year-olds and 15% of 25-34-year-olds actually say they feel more positive about brands that have native ads. Growing up with branded content is likely influencing their more positive POV, but Ypulse research has also found that 82% say “everything I see or read I take with a grain of salt.” (Skyword)

Think Millennials are lazy? What if we told you they don’t even stop working when they’re on vacation? A new survey reports that 35% of Millennials say they work every day of their vacations, and feel less productive when they get back. It’s clear that entering the workplace at a time when they are always accessible via mobile has made an impact. (Time)

Minecraft is hugely popular with young consumers, its influence is growing, and the game is spawning a new kind of celebrity. The Minecon convention in London over July 4th weekend was the largest ever event for a single video game, selling 100,000 tickets. The convention featured Minecraft players with millions of followers, who signed autographs, took pictures with fans, and enjoyed a new era of fame. (Business Insider)

Young consumers might be more willing to give out their data online, but beware: they “will ditch brands” that use it to spam them. Millennials are reportedly 44% more likely than Xers and Boomers to fall into the “sensitive consumer” bracket, and research has found that if annoyed by marketing, 80% of Millennials will block cold callers, 84% will unsubscribe from emails or close accounts, and 82% will delete apps. (Marketing Magazine)

Quote of the Day: "I follow the news so I can make fun of the GOP presidential candidates..." -Male, 30, KN 

Sign Up Now

Subscribe for premium access to our content, data, and tools.

Already a subscriber? Sign in.

Upgrade Now

Upgrade for full access to the best marketing tools for understanding the next generation.

View our Client Case Studies