Decoding Millennial Concertgoers

Today’s post comes from Ypulse’s Research Intern Phil Savarese.

Decoding Millennial Concertgoers

In today’s smartphone-obsessed society, it’s rare that you’ll go to a concert where people aren’t snapping pictures, recording videos, or updating their status during the show. Millennials are extremely interested in seeing artists live and partaking in epic experiences; according to Ypulse research among 339 13-34 year olds, four of five Millennials have been to a concert before. However, the “in the moment” experience of a concert has collided with the timelessness of the digital age. As an avid concertgoer, I‘ve found that smartphone and tablet use during shows has created four types of fans:

“I’ll never get a chance to see this again!” – The Capturer

These are the people that shed some light on the “sea of hands” at concerts, literally. They hold their phone or tablet as high above the crowd as possible to capture the concert forever. Fully, 67% of Millennial concertgoers said that they have taken a picture of a performer with their smartphone. These capturers want to permanently document the concert for future reference. Additionally, 47% said they have filmed parts of the concert. Sometimes this involves distracting oneself from the show or viewing it through a screen, but they sacrifice fully enjoying moments live so that they can enjoy it over and over again.

“Guess where I am?!” – The Bragger

Braggers are the ones who take their attention completely off of the show for a moment to tell their network of friends where they are and what they’re doing. Half of the Millennials surveyed (51%) said they’ve updated a Facebook status during a show, while a quarter (24%) said they’ve Instagramed the performer. They want their friends to know where they are and how much fun it is…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I want to buy a home in the future to be able to own and modify my own space. “ –Female, 32, NE

Apple Music is here, but some say that Millennials won’t pay for it. The new music streaming service launched yesterday, and will cost users $9.99 a month to stream the entire iTunes catalog. However, young consumers are adept at getting their music for free, and the CEO of CMJ predicts “for major music audiences at college level and younger music fans…they will be heavily inclined to stay with and find new ‘free’ services,’” (The Daily Beast)

Salad is so hot right now. Farm-to-table salad chain sweetgreen has raised another $35 million to “satisfy Millennial salad cravings.” The chain will likely continue their expansion, and appealing to younger diners with menu items like “Beets Don’t Kale My Vibe” and branded music festivals. Tech is also a part of their plan: sweetgreen is also developing their ordering app, which already handles 25% of all their transactions. (TechCrunch)

They may have grown up with “Made In China” stamped on the bottom of all their toys, but Millennials may be “the most passionate” about products that are made in America. According to a Ford Motor Company poll, 91% of 16-34-year-olds believe that manufacturers in the U.S. make products that are equal or better quality as foreign competitors, and 74% believe purchasing American-made products is important. (We did tell you they’re patriotic) (Washington Examiner)

Earlier this week we told you about Marriott’s efforts to adjust to young consumers’ traveling preferences, and it looks like rooftop bars are only the beginning. The brand has partnered with Universal Music Group to bring music performances by rising and established artists to hotel lobbies. Jessie J kicked off the venture yesterday in London, and all performances will be free to the hotel guests. (LA Times)

Is the sharing economy hurting Millennials? Some experts are saying that while all this car sharing, home sharing, and rent-everything behavior is well and good in the short term, young consumers “are missing out on recouping the gains from owning appreciating assets.” The idea is that the share economy is delaying Millennials' wealth-accumulation, and contributing to their downward mobility. Ouch. (Time)

Our most recent trend report is now available! The Q2 2015 Ypulse Quarterly covers three major trends we see impacting young consumers, and includes recently fielded data on 13-32-year-olds, Ypulse’s expertise, the most relevant takeaways for brands who want to appeal to Millennials and teens, and tons of other insights. The Q2 2015 report is available to Gold subscribers, and one-off pricing is $1250. (Click here to contact us for information on accessing the report or to learn more about subscribing.

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